Barefooting

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ShadowCat
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Re: Barefootin

Postby ShadowCat » 05 Oct 2015, 11:18

shirley mclaren wrote:There are too many "nasties" lurking underfoot just waiting to enter your body via even the tiniest graze.

I've twice had a staph infection in my lower leg and it's certainly not fun. Since then I'm a bit more discerning too. But on the other hand, even my gp is of the opinion that with common sense and basic hygiene there is little to worry about when walking barefoot. Probably the biggest nasties are transfered from the hands to other parts of your skin.
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Re: Barefooting

Postby Corvid » 06 Oct 2015, 20:35

When I lived in a small town I would frequently run barefoot. Living in a city now I would not consider it, though our city is fairly clean. I am almost always barefoot in my apartment though, even during the winter. I feel a lot more comfortable sans shoes.

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Re: Barefooting

Postby LoonyLuna » 06 Oct 2015, 22:51

I'm always barefoot indoors. I occasionally do walk bare foot in our town and sometime used to walk the mile and half home with no shoes on. Driving in barefoot felt a little odd the first time I did it :)

My youngest son who's 14 very rarely wears shoes. So it's probably a good thing he's home educated :) Getting him to put shoes on can be quite a struggle some days. He is often outside riding his bike, come rain or shine, with not a thing on his feet, much to the consternation of our neighbours! :D
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mandybard
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Re: Barefooting

Postby mandybard » 07 Oct 2015, 08:01

I go barefoot where I can, but in Australia it can be tricky at certain times of the year. Bities and prickly things and dry sharp patches abound and you have to be careful where (and for how long) you stand. Around home it's mostly okay, so long as there's an emergency pair of thongs by the back door ;)
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Markjones
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Re: Barefooting

Postby Markjones » 09 Oct 2015, 14:49

I was brought up to always wear shoes. In the house my father would insist on slippers. When I was 16 I toured the UK with a circus, and with all the hard work and outdoor living my woefully inadequate shoes soon fell apart. That was when I first started going barefoot, and I didn't mind what surface I was walking on. Over the years I have mostly worn shoes, but this summer, I choose to once again go barefoot quite a lot.

Now the weather is turning, I wonder how other feel about it. I have read several posts that talk about winter and snow, but what about really muddy, wet woodland paths for example? The reason I ask is because I did my Bardic initiation yesterday in nearby woodland. Although it was not raining, the ground was very wet. I did the ceremony in (very muddy) boots, but it did cross my mind that I would have preferred to do it barefoot. In fact I actually tucked my trousers in to by socks, and my shirt into my trousers because walking in these woods over the last few weeks, I have been getting a lot of insect bites on my legs, and I was trying to avoid getting more. Do other people suffer from this going barefoot? to you take any steps to prevent this?

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Re: Barefooting

Postby Zebragirly » 21 Oct 2015, 11:19

This summer was the first time I went into the woods and walked barefoot. It was a pineforest, with moss and pineneedles on the ground. It was surprisingly soft. I never hurt my feet, although I'm not used to walking barefoot (only in my garden). I loved it, and it felt very free. Now I'm working in the bardic grade with the element Earth, so I wanted to walk barefoot again. But now it's autumn and quite cold (8 Celcius). BUt I did it anyway. At first it was really cold and my feet cramped, but then I got warm. The sand was moist and stuck to my feet. Mud felt awesome, very soft. And moss felt quite warm, that was a funny thing. I kept surprisingly warm, and my feet didn't get cold at all. At no point did I hurt my feet, but we don't have rocky soil anywhere.

About insects, in summer we have lots of ticks. So I did use some repellent, although I didn't really like doing that. But the alternative wasn't attractive either. I really don't like ticks. It did help, I only found one on my pants after the walk. So you could do that, there are also environmentally friendly repellents. It's better than going barefoot and worry all the time about these things.

Now I'm very curious how walking barefoot will feel when it gets even colder. Will it still be comfortable? I'll found out!
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Re: Barefooting

Postby Kima » 08 Dec 2015, 17:57

I went barefoot for much of the summer and since winter has been mild so far I still go out in sandals whenever possible. Wet weather is ok for me if the temperature is around 8-10°C. I can handle colder temperature if the weather is dry provided there is no eastern wind. I find low temperatures (0-5°) dangerous if I stay out longer than half an hour or so, especially if there is high humidity. It's easier to walk on ice than snow, I've found – cold dry is easier to handle than wet dry – but one must be careful not to take risks when frostbite could become an issue.

I got a tick last spring, but I was following a fox through the underbrush. Other than that I haven't had to worry about bugs, except when I stood on ants' path close to the anthill :duck:

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mandybard
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Re: Barefooting

Postby mandybard » 10 Dec 2015, 22:57

For insects and bugs there are quite a few natural repellant recipes you can Google, depending on what ingredients you have access to (eg some involve distilling or boiling certain herbs or citrus rind, others go straight to the essential oils, different types of carriers etc). Main thing is if you have animals, cats especially, avoid citronella - although it's considered safe for them and is often used in natural pet insect products, to them it can actually smell like another animal's territory marking so some find it off-putting.
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Love took up the glass of Time, and turn'd it in his glowing hands;
Every moment, lightly shaken, ran itself in golden sands.
Love took up the harp of Life, and smote on all the chords with might;
Smote the chord of Self, that, trembling, pass'd in music out of sight.
(from Locksley Hall by Alfred Lord Tennyson)

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Re: Barefooting

Postby samurai » 25 Mar 2016, 09:33

Have'nt been on here for an age. Thinking of starting barefoot running,partially after reading a book called "Free Running" by Richard Askwith. But also thinking it maybe better on my old ankles . I mainly trail run, but think I should air on the side of caution and wear some of those five toe rubber shoes to start. Anyone have any experience with them?

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Màiri
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Re: Barefooting

Postby Màiri » 25 Mar 2016, 10:02

Hello samurai,
I can't say anything about these barefoot-shoes out of my own experience. I use to walk with a friend who wears these shoes and she is a convinced user. I never noticed here saying "outch". The shoes give a barefoot-feeling, help to train the muscles and at the same time they protect the feet.
Greetings, Màiri
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ShadowCat
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Re: Barefooting

Postby ShadowCat » 25 Mar 2016, 13:06

samurai wrote: and wear some of those five toe rubber shoes to start. Anyone have any experience with them?


I've got a pair of vibram fivefingers. For me personally, they don't fit very well: I have relative small toes compared to my footsize, and my toes pop out of their designated place. I do use them as a watershoe though and for that they are fine. Not for running.

When walking/hiking in summer I wear a pair of xeroshoes. I have the more luxury-version with webbing-straps and they fit more like a regular hiking-sandal, only lightweight. I like them a lot!
Three sounds one should treasure:
the whisper of the wind through the leaves
the songs of one's heart
the callings of the universe

BS13 I BS13 II LI13 SB13 IL14 LI14 SB14 BS15 LI 15
Sacred spaces and places

samurai
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Re: Barefooting

Postby samurai » 25 Mar 2016, 19:19

Reading up about the 5 toe shoes they say you may need to get a size below. I want to trail run as that's what I enjoy,so I hope a minalistic footwear will help the transistion from regular shoes to barefoot.

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BCPantheist
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Re: Barefooting

Postby BCPantheist » 18 Apr 2016, 03:35

It's been years since I read it, but Richard Frazine's The Barefoot Hiker, and Daniel Howell's The Barefoot Book, are both great resources for foot-care and exercises to aid barefooters, from tenderfoot to veteran.

Personally, I can't stand wearing shoes, and will generally avoid it, unless I'm somewhere where it's necessary.
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