Nigella sativa seed uses

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Lily
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Re: Nigella sativa seed uses

Postby Lily » 22 Oct 2012, 21:34

Nigella sativa, native to south and southwest Asia.
(Wikipedia)

hence, the traditional usage in Druidic medicine will be a bit thinly documented. It is not a native European plant... but surely modern herbalists will have uses for it.
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Reuils
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Re: Nigella sativa seed uses

Postby Reuils » 15 May 2014, 10:27

Gosh ,to think I only use them to flavour parmaesan biscuits !! :oops:

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Whitemane
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Re: Nigella sativa seed uses

Postby Whitemane » 19 May 2014, 18:13

Nigella sativa is also used as the ornamental flower love-in-a-mist :)

The main component of the seed oil is thymoquinone, and like all good quinones, it's an antioxidant and can quench reactive oxygen species. Most of the other non-fat components of the seed oil are terpenes, which will do pretty much the same thing. This does indicate that it will have some beneficial effects, but a lot depends on how large and well-designed and executed the various studies on its use have been.

At high levels, the oil is toxic, so take care with it.
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Lora
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Re: Nigella sativa seed uses

Postby Lora » 10 Aug 2014, 16:05

Love-in-a-mist is Nigella damascena, not the same plant as Nigella sativa. Clearly the two plants are fairly closely related, but best check whether damascena seeds are edible or have the same usage.


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