My Daily Card - Water Dragon

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Corvid
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My Daily Card - Water Dragon

Postby Corvid » 28 Sep 2015, 17:06

I am working on an important and taxing project, trying to get my research written up for publication, and for today's card I asked for some insight on the work I was going to achieve today. I pulled the Water Dragon. This is the first time I have pulled this card for a daily reading and thought I'd discuss it here as typing this out may bring me closer to understanding the meaning. I am not yet sure what to make of it and would love any input!

According to the book:

Water Dragon, Draig-Uisge

Keywords: Passion, Depth, Connection

Book Description:

The card shows the Stoor Worm, a great sea-dragon whose "head was like a mountain and his eyes like round lochs, very dark and deep." Living off the coast of northern Scotland, he could only be appeased with the offering of seven virgins, bound hand and foot and laid on a rock beside the shore each Saturday. A young man called Assipattle killed him by riding a boat into his body and setting fire to hist liver. As the dragon died, the crashing of his tongue made the Baltic Sea. As his teeth fell out, they made the Orkneys, the Shetlands, and the Faeroe Islands. Finally, he coiled himself up tightly and crashed into the sea- and old folk say that Iceland is his body, the liver still burning beneath the smoldering crust.

The Water Dragon brings that which is hidden int the light of day. Memories and wishes, which may have long laid forgotten or repressed in the Unconcious, may emerge to frighten or overwhelm you with their apparent negativity or destructiveness. Facing these experiences with compassion and courage will,in the end, bring you to an experience of a greater depth of soul and a greater sense of connectedness to all life. Although you may at times feel overwhelmed with emotion, with time you will be able to achieve a sense of balance and stability, as these strong feelings are integrated into your consciousness.

Drawn Reversed, this card warns us to approach an exploration of our psyche and our past with caution. The conscious self can absorb the impact of only a limited amount of repressed or unconscious material being released into awareness. It is wise to work fractionally, little by little, to integrate unconscious material into consciousness. Beware also of allowing your emotions to rule you in way that later you will regret.

The Tradition of the Water Dragon

One Sunday morning Lambton went
A-fishing in the Water,
And catched a fish upin his hook
He thought looked verry queer,
But whatten a kind of fish it was
Young Lambton couldn't tell;
He wouldn't fash to carry it home,
So he hoyed it in a well
From "The Lambton Worm"

Just as life is said to have arisen out of the primal depths of the ocean, so too did the dragon begin its life as the Worm - a large snake or eel-like creature, sometimes horned, that would live in wells or lochs or the sea. Later in its mythological development, the Worm grew small wings and two feet and became the Wyvern, finally transforming itself into the fully-fledged Dragon with four feet, larger ribbed wings and a barbed tail.

Some Worms leave their watery habitats to coil around hills and terrorize the countryside, but others remain in the water and are depicted as sea or water monsters, the most famous living in Loch Ness. The first encounter with this creature on record tells of St. Columba saving a friend who was swimming across the river Ness. As the monster broke the surface of the water behind the swimmer, and opened his mouth wide with a great roar, Columba shouted, "Go thou no further nor tough the man. Go back at once." And the creature obeyed.

The Loch Ness monster is not unique: the whirlpools of the River Taff at Cardiff and Llyn-y-Gader lake in Snowdonia are renowned for their worms or water dragons who quickly devour anyone unfortunate enough to fall in - leaving the swirling waters blood-red within minutes.

The Lambton Worm

Other Worms migrate from the water to land. The Lambton Worm of County Durham, immortalized in the folk song quoted above, was first discovered by Lambton as a boy, when he was fishing in the river Wear. Contemptuous of his catch, which tuned out to be a strange eel-like creature, he threw it in a well, forgetting all about it, until years later he returned from the Crusades to discover that the Worm had "grew and grew so lithlie and so strong" that he no longer lived in the well, but at night "crawled about to pick up bits of news," and "if he felt dry upon the road he milked a dozen cows," After he had feasted on calves and labs, children and sheep he would crawl away and lap his tail ten times around Lambton Hill.

Lambton had a special suit of armor made, with the front and back studded with steel blades. He then stood on a rock in the middle of the river and blew a horn, waking the Worm, which had been coiled asleep on the hill nearby. Slithering down the river, it wound itself around Lambton, trying to crush him. But the blades cut and tore at the Worm, who fell in pieces into the river.

Gateways to the Otherworld

Whether the dragon is fully-fledged and fire-breathing, or is more primal and worm-like, there is a significant preponderance of water in all its forms - river, well, pool, lake, marsh, bog, and sea - in most dragon stories. Water, and in particular its sources, was sacred to the Druids, who also considered such places gateways to the Under or Otherworld. Since the dragon is an Otherworldly creature, it is fitting that it should emerge from such a gateway. In psychological terms, water represents the Unconscious and the emergence of monsters or dragons from sea, well or lake represents unresolved complexes, repressed an distorted drives and desires, welling up into awareness. The destructive water dragon symbolizes perfectly the damaging nature of certain contents of the psyche, which, for the healing of the self, require a transmutation that may be depicted as a symbolic death.

For well over a thousand years such a destructive dragon was said to have lived in a pool called Knucker Hole at Lyminster in Sussex. Fed by a strong underground source, the pool was thought bottomless (in reality it is about thirty feet deep) and the home of Knicker the Dragon. By night he would go hunting in the marshy Arun valley, eating horses and cows, and finishing his meal by "sitting top o' Causeway, and anybody come along there, he'd lick 'em up, like a toad licking flies off a stone."

A local lad, Jim Puttock, baked an enormous and indigestible pudding which he fed to Knucker. As it writhed on the ground with stomach-ache, he chopped its head off. The unmarked grave of Puttock the dragon-slayer can still be seen in Lynmister church. With the added effect of keeping children away from a local danger-spot, the tale combines an ancient mythological theme with local humor: "Sussex Pudding" was notoriously indigestible.

Earth and air dragons are usually harmless if not disturbed, and it is rare for the land or sky to present any great threat to us. But the elements of fire and water can indeed be dangerous, and the water dragon can overwhelm us with emotion and drown us in sorrow or self-pity. But if befriended, if related to as an ally rather than enemy, it can bring passions, compassion, depth of feeling and a true sense of connection to all of humanity and the world of nature.

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DaRC
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Re: My Daily Card - Water Dragon

Postby DaRC » 29 Sep 2015, 11:58

Really interesting,I was looking at the title & thinking Water Dragon??? 8-)
Then I read on and understood that you meant a good ol' Knucker :grin:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knucker
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
http://gewessiman.blogspot.co.uk Image

Corvid
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Re: My Daily Card - Water Dragon

Postby Corvid » 29 Sep 2015, 16:57

Really interesting,I was looking at the title & thinking Water Dragon??? 8-)
Then I read on and understood that you meant a good ol' Knucker :grin:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knucker
As an American a Knucker is not a term I was familiar with until this reading. :) I'm used to Worm or simply Water Dragon. Any insight on what was meant by the card?

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DaRC
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Re: My Daily Card - Water Dragon

Postby DaRC » 30 Sep 2015, 11:52

Hmmm well just looking through your post these stick out to me
trying to get my research written up for publication,
brings that which is hidden into the light of day.
Although you may at times feel overwhelmed ..., with time you will be able to achieve a sense of balance
Which all seems appropriate to writing up research :o

As an aside, the little ditty about the Lambton Worm is very similar to the story where Thor goes fishing with the Jotun, Hymir
http://norse-mythology.org/tales/thor-f ... ormungand/ Jormungand is one of Loki's children by Angrbodra and is the World Serpent or Ouroboros; the snake eating it's own tail which, some, philosophically relate to Self-reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-reference
Jung related it to having archetypal significance as part of the universal unconcsious - this fits into the story cycle of the Knucker hole which is a really deep watery hole (one where you can't find the bottom and thus travels into the underworld).
Sussex ponds, like the Lyminster Knucker Hole, were/are muddy ponds famous for their muddy deeps and ability to swallow a horse & carriage whole.
BTW the mud really stinks 8-) I remember my mother being less than pleased after I fell into our local one as a lad.

As to Sussex Pond Pudding being indigestible I refute that... they are lovely
http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/cuis ... sauce.html
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
http://gewessiman.blogspot.co.uk Image

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MoonPryderi
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Re: My Daily Card - Water Dragon

Postby MoonPryderi » 30 Sep 2015, 12:33

This is an interesting post with lots of things I didnt know

The Water Dragon also exists in Chinese astrology and I am one
Moon Pryderi

"Words have the power to both destroy and heal. When words are both true and kind, they can change our world .... Buddha"

https://dreamingpath.wordpress.com




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Corvid
Posts: 24
Joined: 28 Sep 2015, 03:27
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Re: My Daily Card - Water Dragon

Postby Corvid » 30 Sep 2015, 15:57

Hmmm well just looking through your post these stick out to me
trying to get my research written up for publication,
brings that which is hidden into the light of day.
Although you may at times feel overwhelmed ..., with time you will be able to achieve a sense of balance
Which all seems appropriate to writing up research :o
It does seem appropriate! I've been working on this with my colleague for a year and we are at the end of the journey. It's been enlightening, frustrating and wonderful.

Great links, DaRC, thank you! I am not well versed in Heathen lore so that was news to me. The mud probably stinks due to all of the rotting vegetation within it as well as any swampy bacterial agents doing their thing. We have stinky swamps over here as well, but they are also beautiful in their own way.

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DaRC
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Re: My Daily Card - Water Dragon

Postby DaRC » 01 Oct 2015, 11:50

Actually thank you :hug: :tiphat: very much
Your post took me on a journey (the detail will be on my blog, probably tomorrow) deeper into the Alchemical element of the western mystical tradition via a flow from the Water Dragon to the Knucker to the deep dark unconscious self, via the Knucker Hole, and this led me to the Alchemical transformation which led me back to my childhood and Abraxas and the musical paradise that is Santana Abraxas.
As a youth I must have read Ursule K LeGuin's 'A Wizard of Earthsea' a hundred times and every time I read it I listened to Santana's Abraxas on repeat, the music and story would converge meaning that hours could pass without me recognising the passing of time and barely remembering turning the LP record over.
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
http://gewessiman.blogspot.co.uk Image

Corvid
Posts: 24
Joined: 28 Sep 2015, 03:27
Gender: Female
Contact:

Re: My Daily Card - Water Dragon

Postby Corvid » 01 Oct 2015, 21:30

Actually thank you :hug: :tiphat: very much
Your post took me on a journey (the detail will be on my blog, probably tomorrow) deeper into the Alchemical element of the western mystical tradition via a flow from the Water Dragon to the Knucker to the deep dark unconscious self, via the Knucker Hole, and this led me to the Alchemical transformation which led me back to my childhood and Abraxas and the musical paradise that is Santana Abraxas.
As a youth I must have read Ursule K LeGuin's 'A Wizard of Earthsea' a hundred times and every time I read it I listened to Santana's Abraxas on repeat, the music and story would converge meaning that hours could pass without me recognising the passing of time and barely remembering turning the LP record over.
I'm very happy to hear my post was so beneficial to you! You've made my day. :) :hug: It's wonderful when we receive such meaningful inspiration from someone else's question or description. I look forward to reading your blog post and maybe playing some Santana!

You know, I'm a actually an ADF member because I enjoy the doctrine and structured ritual, but I am finding the OBOD community to be easier to talk with and more available (their forums are very slow). As a solitary the internet is where I have a sense of community. If I can afford it I may wish to join both Druid groups for a more well-rounded experience.


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