Textual Inspiration

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Aphritha
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Textual Inspiration

Postby Aphritha » 03 May 2014, 22:44

So many spiritual paths have their 'holy books'. The Bible, Quran, and Torah seem to be the most well known. There are others, of course; countless it seems. I Ching, the Vedas, the Eddas, and the numerous 'additional books' of the various sects of Christianity come to mind. I see wikipedia lists the Mabinogion and the Book of Invasions as Druidry's 'holy books' (though I'm sure that could be disputed).
Though some individuals use these texts as rules to live by, I think the good majority of people simple find inspiration in these books. How about you? What books do you find yourself returning to again and again for inspiration in your life?


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Sciethe
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Re: Textual Inspiration

Postby Sciethe » 03 May 2014, 23:34

I keep on coming back to two things most often, the poetry of Peter Redgrove which reminds me of the spirit immanent in nature if I'm getting lost, and Mervyn Peake's Gormenghast Trilogy which is a very strange steering device for an Ovate, but leads the way so well in understanding restlessness, masculinity, (I'm a man...) loss, transitory and permanent things, so much of what we encounter in our journeys. :o
S
For in his morning orisons he loves the sun and the sun loves him. For he is of the tribe of Tiger. Christopher Smart

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Aphritha
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Re: Textual Inspiration

Postby Aphritha » 04 May 2014, 00:39

I but leads the way so well in understanding restlessness, masculinity, (I'm a man...)
I'm not so sure wanting to understand masculinity is exclusive to men... :D What's the trilogy about?
I haven't heard of Peter Redgrove, but if I ever run across his work I'll take a peek. :)


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Sciethe
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Re: Textual Inspiration

Postby Sciethe » 05 May 2014, 00:27

I'm not so sure wanting to understand masculinity is exclusive to men... :D What's the trilogy about?
I haven't heard of Peter Redgrove, but if I ever run across his work I'll take a peek. :)
True, my bad.

The Gormenghast Triology is a fantasy, a towering fantastical mountain of beautiful prose set around a castle so vast that a person couldn't explore it in a lifetime, a great decaying Earldom filled with characters so huge, beautifully drawn and fascinating that you'll cry at the end just because the book is finished and they've gone. It's wise, savage, human and haunting. A contender for the greatest work of fiction ever written in my estimation, a work of the most consummate genius. There was a pretty good dramatization on UK TV a few years ago, but it didn't come close to the experience of reading the book. Tragically Peake died of a degenerative brain disease while he was drafting the last book.

Peter Redgrove is hard to accidentally run across, his poetry is a bit too Pagan for the mainstream perhaps, the book are rare. It's worth hunting down though, for those of a free-thinking persuasion who see the divine in nature. He's a great poet, not too many collections keep you reading compulsively.
Copyright requires that I don't reproduce too much, but it's like this:
...
She catches the bloodless statue of her
Revered boatman-brother a ringing blow with
A mallet; the pure note vibrating
Through the gouged stone sustains
For three hours of morning reverie
During which time at this pitch
(Om) her petitions come to pass
Beyond her expectations, or anybody’s:
Gardens, walks,
Silvery lads and encounters among the knotgardens,
Clavichords humming to the shrill-chanting beds
In the manor dark as horn.
...
And so much more.
S
For in his morning orisons he loves the sun and the sun loves him. For he is of the tribe of Tiger. Christopher Smart

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Aphritha
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Re: Textual Inspiration

Postby Aphritha » 05 May 2014, 02:14

Thanks for sharing that bit; I had tried to look him up but only found reviews.
There was a pretty good dramatization on UK TV a few years ago, but it didn't come close to the experience of reading the book.
As it is with most things. I'd have to say my 'inspirational book' would be What Dreams May Come by Richard Matheson. That, too, was put on film, and while the movie was great(this coming from someone who strongly dislikes movies), the book was incomparable.


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Sciethe
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Re: Textual Inspiration

Postby Sciethe » 05 May 2014, 19:59

As it is with most things. I'd have to say my 'inspirational book' would be What Dreams May Come by Richard Matheson. That, too, was put on film, and while the movie was great(this coming from someone who strongly dislikes movies), the book was incomparable.
OK, I'll get it and read it. I've got really lazy with my reading recently, constantly recycling Terry Pratchett, Michael Moorcock and Tom Holt- the reading equivalent of wandering about sucking my thumb. Not saying the books are bad, they're great, I've just read them TOO many times! :roll:
S
For in his morning orisons he loves the sun and the sun loves him. For he is of the tribe of Tiger. Christopher Smart

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Aphritha
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Re: Textual Inspiration

Postby Aphritha » 05 May 2014, 22:32

the reading equivalent of wandering about sucking my thumb.
I had a good laugh at that...


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Re: Textual Inspiration

Postby ShadowCat » 28 Oct 2014, 14:33

the reading equivalent of wandering about sucking my thumb.
I had a good laugh at that...
Teeheee, I've got this habit too before going to bed, always recycling a few of the same high fantasy novels that I keep reading over and over, they feel a bit like mantra's, the familar sentences calming my normally rather hyperactive mind.

- - -

The lack of any definitive "holy book of druidry" is a great feature in my opinion, because it challenges you to forage for knowledge yourself. Hell, I don't even own one single book by PCG (maybe now I'll get kicked out :whistle: ). Since I work in law, reading is a large part of my work. Mostly nonfiction ofcourse, although some lawyers seem to aim at writing fiction more than fact :grin: Even in the dry dusty tomes that are lawbooks, there can be inspiration: why do we consider something "right", "just" or "fair".

I too find inspiration in childrens books (my pagan path started when I read the books by Monica Furlong when I was a little girl), poetry, cabaret, cartoons, fiction like Tolkien or Paolini, blogs, everywhere really. Especially when reading between the lines...

If I would be limited to talking only a single book with me, I would go back to the books of Monica Furlong, since they sparked it for me, so they are my "source".
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the whisper of the wind through the leaves
the songs of one's heart
the callings of the universe

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Aphritha
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Re: Textual Inspiration

Postby Aphritha » 28 Oct 2014, 16:09

Children's books can be really inspirational...they're meant to captivate the imagination and hold attention. I'm known to leaf through my son's from time to time...and he's known to leaf through mine. Makes him feel more 'grown up'.
I've been finding alot of inspiration in the World Mythology series. I read the Celtic one that was on the Bardic reading list. And then I read it again. And then I started peeking at it in my spare time. And then I realized there were more books in the series... Over a year's time I managed to locate them all. I've been reading a story a night at random to my husband. They're written from a standpoint to hold either an adult or child, and its been quite enjoyable.


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DaRC
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Re: Textual Inspiration

Postby DaRC » 28 Oct 2014, 16:18

the reading equivalent of wandering about sucking my thumb.
I had a good laugh at that...
Teeheee, I've got this habit too before going to bed, always recycling a few of the same high fantasy novels
Ahh yes I have started to limit myself on this (Tolkien, Moorcock, Lieber and R.E. Howard) and also I try to avoid the pale imitations (squints at Robert Jordan books). It's nice to go back once in a while though.

I suppose the one that really got me as a kid was Ursula LeGuin's 'Wizard of Earthsea' along with various kids King Arthur tales. After that, in my early teens, I spent a lot of time at the back of the library reading all the old Norse & Celtic Myths. I then expanded into world mythology before I came to Druidry (and then re-read again all the Norse & Celtic Myths).

Sciethe - you should have a look at Joe Abercrombie & Scott Lynch for a more modern change (I also like the on-line e-zine Heroic Fantasy Quarterly http://www.heroicfantasyquarterly.com/
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
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