Druid in Training

This forum is for discussing all aspects of Druidry as a spiritual path.
Forum rules
If you find a topic of interest and want to continue the discussion then start a new topic under The Hearthfire with a similar name and add a link back to the topic you want to continue.
To copy a link just copy the url on the top left of your browser and then put in your post, highlight it and press the url button.
User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2141
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby treegod » 30 Aug 2015, 17:31

Beith: Regeneration of Forests
In both Britain and Spain there is a common phrase: there was so much forest that a squirrel could have gone from the South to the North without touching the floor. Nowadays we cannot talk of a continuous forest but of landscapes dotted with woods, very few of which are ancient. But nature regenerates and renews itself, and that is the message of Beith, the first few (or letter) of the Ogham, an old Celtic alphabet, which is well known for its association with trees – though there are other lists, like birds, colours, lakes, tools and so on.

In the Tree Ogham Beith corresponds to the birch tree, which is quick to propagate and grow. Where there is no forest in North European countries, this will be the first one to establish new forest and pave the way for other species, hence its association with regeneration and renewal. But in our part of the Mediterranean there are no birch trees since it is far too dry and hot for them, leaving Beith without a tree. Enter the Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis), resistent to heat and dry weather, and also a tree that will quickly cover forest-less landscapes. Here, we refer to it as the “white pine” (distinguishing it from “red” and “black” varieties), further strengthening its association with the birch tree.

Spain, like many places in Europe and the world, has been subject to a lot of deforestation from the times of the Romans onwards, so only the fastest growing trees would come back, like the Aleppo pine, leaving slower growing trees struggling to recover.

I was looking one day at old aerial photographs of the valley where I live and was amazed to see that just a few decades ago there were hundreds of terraces used for hazel, olive and apple orchards. Now, all this land has become forest, and the terraces are hidden beneath a skin of Aleppo forest. The forest is regenerating!

When I came from England to live here, I didn’t appreciate this pine enough, since I was used to deciduous, broad-leafed forests with a lot more greenness and humidity – knowing what I know now, I can appreciate it more. The land has been cleared of forest, but now it has been left to its own devices, and the Forest is coming back. Long may it continue!

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2141
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby treegod » 30 Aug 2015, 17:36

Druidic Inspiration
I've just started reading Blood and Mistletoe by Ronald Hutton, tracing the perception of the druids through history – which is probably easier than trying to figure out what they actually were. We are given various descriptions from Greek and Roman authors with motives of their own to describe the druids the way they did – can’t be relied on for accuracy. They are vilified or romanticised, depending on who is writing.

The image (or images) of the druid, though invented, adapted or exagerrated, have proven to be a useful resource for propoganda through history and also to become the basis of a whole movement which may emphasise their social, cultural, spiritual, religious, magical, shamanic or political functions.

The druids are many things to many people, but using historic persons in this was is no new thing – the Jesus of the Roman Catholics is different from the Baptist Jesus is different from the Lutheran Jesus; the Buddha emerging in the West has diverged in some ways from his traditional portrayals in the East. Their personalities and roles are adapted to the needs and wants of the people, and yet they are the basis of legitimacy for their respective cultures and religions.

In this context, I think it’s significant that one of the central concepts of modern Druidry is “Awen” or Inspiration, something that just about all druid groups after the Druid Revival share. It is described as a divine source of creativity, but not only that, I think it symbolises modern Druidry itself as something creative and versatile, that the nature of those ancient druids is determined by the use of their image. As I read through Blood and Mistletoe, I shall reasses the various images and my own of them and share my thoughts here. It’s certainly a good read, and I’m only on the second chapter.

User avatar
DaRC
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 4845
Joined: 06 Feb 2003, 17:13
Gender: Male
Location: Sussex
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby DaRC » 31 Aug 2015, 12:33

Very interesting about the White Pine, how does the woodland regenerate once the pine has grown? After Birch and Alder we have Oak, Ash and other deciduous trees as you know. Particularly as I watch La Vuelta wonder about it's sparseness, although I am feeding off its visual heat after a decidedly cool summer here.
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
http://gewessiman.blogspot.co.uk Image

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2141
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby treegod » 31 Aug 2015, 13:25

Very interesting about the White Pine, how does the woodland regenerate once the pine has grown?
I'm not exactly sure, but I think broad-leafed trees would become dominant, anything that can handle hot dry conditions. Holm Oak is particularily typical of this part of the Med, and in my valley there's a whole forest ecosystem of it. Then there's Portuguese Oak, European Nettle Tree (Celtis australis), as well as Ash (more F. angustifolia than F. excelsior). There're palm trees

Never watched La Vuelta, but it must pass through much drier and sparser regions than where I live. Inland from me, in Aragon, there's the Monegros Desert, which supposedly was forest too. Now it's an important zone for conservation.

User avatar
DaRC
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 4845
Joined: 06 Feb 2003, 17:13
Gender: Male
Location: Sussex
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby DaRC » 01 Sep 2015, 11:54

Ahhh so you expect the more deciduous trees to move in once the pines have colonised.
Never watched La Vuelta, but it must pass through much drier and sparser regions than where I live.
:where: like the other big tours (France and Italy) the route varies year by year and covers the whole of the country so it's bound to have passed / will pass near to you at some stage.
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
http://gewessiman.blogspot.co.uk Image

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2141
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby treegod » 04 Sep 2015, 12:25

I've been working on something recently along these lines:

Three sources that form Druidry: ancient rumour, historical speculation and modern necessity.

A series of blogs that'll be published over the coming weeks. :)

User avatar
Whitemane
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 1515
Joined: 19 Jan 2012, 21:21
Gender: Male
Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby Whitemane » 04 Sep 2015, 17:54

I've been working on something recently along these lines:

Three sources that form Druidry: ancient rumour, historical speculation and modern necessity.

A series of blogs that'll be published over the coming weeks. :)
:applause:
May the long time sun shine upon you,
All love surround you,
And the pure light within you,
Guide your way on.

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2141
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby treegod » 06 Sep 2015, 17:44

Druidic Inspiration: Historical Generalisations

Carrying on from the idea that modern Druidry is based on Awen and invention…

What if, just what if there were no druids, that Celtic society had no specific caste/class that specialised in education, justice, healing, philosophy, magic or religion, and that the “druids” that the ancient Greeks and Romans wrote about were not members of said caste/class but were simply individuals taken from any part of their society – warrior, aristocrat, craftsman, farmer, merchant – with the relevant skills and knowledge. They were not organised or perennial enough in Celtic society to be seen as A Thing, but a semi-coherent variety of things that have been lumped together under the convenient label of “druid” (in modern times we could do the same and say that doctors, judges, solicitors, diplomats, artists, journalists, historians, theologians, priests are all “druids”).

This is perfectly possible, but has big consequences for how we view the neo-druid movement: everything we do or believe that we call “druidry” is based on a fantasy (shock-horror)!!! But fret not, this can be asserted with a fair amount of confidence about any spiritual or religious tradition. At some point they were all “invented” by other people, it’s just some have age and social prestige in their favour, making them a little more credible.

More posts to come on the subject!

rainwater
OBOD Bard
Posts: 9
Joined: 11 Apr 2015, 15:05
Gender: Female
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby rainwater » 08 Sep 2015, 02:47

Druidic Inspiration: Historical Generalisations

This is perfectly possible, but has big consequences for how we view the neo-druid movement: everything we do or believe that we call “druidry” is based on a fantasy (shock-horror)!!! But fret not, this can be asserted with a fair amount of confidence about any spiritual or religious tradition. At some point they were all “invented” by other people, it’s just some have age and social prestige in their favour, making them a little more credible.
Funny how you restrict this idea to religion. Much of what we do everyday is based on fantasy. Truth, honor, common courtesy..all ideas we choose to believe or not believe to varying degrees. It's hardly shocking.

And honestly, how many people can say that they know for a fact that they live in a way that is absolutely accurate to the way their ancestors lived?

User avatar
DJ Droood
OBOD Druid
Posts: 5558
Joined: 02 Feb 2003, 18:52
Gender: Male
Location: North Eastern North America
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby DJ Droood » 08 Sep 2015, 04:12

Funny how you restrict this idea to religion. Much of what we do everyday is based on fantasy. Truth, honor, common courtesy..all ideas we choose to believe or not believe to varying degrees. It's hardly shocking.
or democracy, capitalism, marxism, nations, Beliebers...we all buy into notions that are really just based on consensus opinion...there isn't really much tangible going on....we have symbols of concepts...dollar signs, flags...we agree that the paper means something (often by threat of imprisonment!)...but if we are in our country and pick up a handful of soil, it is just a handful of soil.

I think the issue with Druidry is that as a relatively new and fluid movement, the consensus is a bit vague.
Image
2010 LI
2011 LI
2013 BS
Image
12/10-Ancestors
"If organized religion is the opium of the masses, then disorganized religion is the marijuana of the lunatic fringe."
Kerry Thornley

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2141
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby treegod » 08 Sep 2015, 09:40

Funny how you restrict this idea to religion. Much of what we do everyday is based on fantasy. Truth, honor, common courtesy..all ideas we choose to believe or not believe to varying degrees. It's hardly shocking.
Restricted? I'm not sure I understand. It's just one example, relevent to the subject, that can be expanded upon, as you and Dj have done. :)
And it's only shocking for people that take it all too seriously (and most druids I've met here have a sense of humour :wink: )

User avatar
DaRC
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 4845
Joined: 06 Feb 2003, 17:13
Gender: Male
Location: Sussex
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby DaRC » 08 Sep 2015, 12:00

everything we do or believe that we call “druidry” is based on a fantasy
Much of what we do everyday is based on fantasy.
Hmmm I think I would critique the use of the word fantasy
1. imagination, especially when extravagant and unrestrained.
2. the forming of mental images, especially wondrous or strange fancies; imaginative conceptualizing.
3. a mental image, especially when unreal or fantastic; vision: a nightmare fantasy.
4. Psychology. an imagined or conjured up sequence fulfilling a psychological need; daydream.
5. a hallucination.
6. a supposition based on no solid foundation; visionary idea; illusion:
dreams of Utopias and similar fantasies.
7. caprice; whim.
8. an ingenious or fanciful thought, design, or invention.
The only possible version could potentially be 4. These social constructs are not the fantastical imagenings of a single mind but are the building blocks of social cohesion, created from real-life person to person physical interactions.

I would argue that followers of the Meso Druidic movement of the 19th & early 20th Century may have been shocked by your thoughts around "What if, just what if there were no druids,... were not members of said caste/class" whilst the Neo-druidic movements of the latter 20th Century have spent plenty of time questioning whether it all has been a made up fantasy, and finding answers in both literature and more latterly in Archaeology that have influenced their writings. Certainly OBOD acknowledges a continuum from the ancient world, through Meso druidry and onto Neo druidry.

However, I do agree that at some point any spiritual or religious tradition started it's evolution, although I disagree with the word invented. I think cults tend to be 'invented' by individuals, whilst spiritual and religious movements evolve due to their social nature. After several generations they can become a tradition.
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
http://gewessiman.blogspot.co.uk Image

rainwater
OBOD Bard
Posts: 9
Joined: 11 Apr 2015, 15:05
Gender: Female
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby rainwater » 09 Sep 2015, 04:13


The only possible version could potentially be 4. These social constructs are not the fantastical imagenings of a single mind but are the building blocks of social cohesion, created from real-life person to person physical interactions.

Really? I think 8 fits my meaning better or maybe 6... although I do really like 2 for the phrase "imaginative conceptualizing." :grin:

I personally don't mean "fantasy" in a pejorative sense, nor do I mean it to be individualistic. Society is not the fevered dream of a madman. But... many of the rules by which society operates--especially the often unspoken ones--seem to be based on or sustained by certain collective imaginings, which can and do change across cultures. Real-life interaction does not preclude the creation of fantasy; if anything, it enhances it.

Well, my 2 cents anyway.

rainwater
OBOD Bard
Posts: 9
Joined: 11 Apr 2015, 15:05
Gender: Female
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby rainwater » 09 Sep 2015, 04:58

Funny how you restrict this idea to religion. Much of what we do everyday is based on fantasy. Truth, honor, common courtesy..all ideas we choose to believe or not believe to varying degrees. It's hardly shocking.
Restricted? I'm not sure I understand. It's just one example, relevent to the subject, that can be expanded upon, as you and Dj have done. :)
And it's only shocking for people that take it all too seriously (and most druids I've met here have a sense of humour :wink: )
Yeah, honestly, I'm not 100% sure I understand either. I was a bit tired when I wrote that. I think it was a mixed sarcastic and genuinely curious, "Yes, and your point?"

I think the issue with Druidry is that as a relatively new and fluid movement, the consensus is a bit vague.
I dunno... it seems you can always find the arguments between Group A and Group B over who practices "real [insert faith]" even among practitioners of the older, established religions/faiths/spiritualities/whatever; so, does the history really make a difference? <---Ooo...I think I just stumbled onto the not well-stated point of my earlier post! :yay:

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2141
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby treegod » 09 Sep 2015, 09:50

The only possible version could potentially be 4. These social constructs are not the fantastical imagenings of a single mind but are the building blocks of social cohesion, created from real-life person to person physical interactions.
I think it we can apply any or all of those definitions, depending on the druid we speak to. My own intention was to say "born from the human mind", which can easily involve the fantastical imaginings of multiple minds, propogated by human relationships.
However, I do agree that at some point any spiritual or religious tradition started it's evolution, although I disagree with the word invented. I think cults tend to be 'invented' by individuals, whilst spiritual and religious movements evolve due to their social nature. After several generations they can become a tradition.
Invented at source, is what I was thinking. Many modern druid traditions can be traced back to Iolo Morganwg (amongst others), but they've taken on a life of their own since then.
Iolo had some very fertile seeds that germinated in very fertile social soil for his time, any other time and he would have failed. The difference between movement and cult is a question of centralisation, but they both need the right social conditions to flourish. They are both "social constructs", and even cults can take on a life of their own beyond the intentions of their leaders.
I dunno... it seems you can always find the arguments between Group A and Group B over who practices "real [insert faith]" even among practitioners of the older, established religions/faiths/spiritualities/whatever; so, does the history really make a difference? <---Ooo...I think I just stumbled onto the not well-stated point of my earlier post! :yay:
Exactly :shake:
Plenty of groups that have tried to regain the "purity" of primitive Christianity, and with very different answers.

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2141
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby treegod » 09 Sep 2015, 09:54

Second to last.
And thanks for the comments and messages. It's giving me food for thought. :)

Druidic Inspiration: Tradition, History and Fiction
Druidry is here and well-established, and continues with whatever “facts” are facing it. What we know of the druids comes from biased and/or invented second-hand reports. Whatever wisdom they left might be found in medieval sources and folklore, but not without heavy alteration over time and by the hands of Christian scribes. Any connection between archaeology and the druids is, necessarily, speculation. And yet modern Druidry continues unabashed.

Some druids will, like many, ignore the evidence, and carry on believing what they want (this is common enough, many still hold to Genesis over geology, and even new scientific theories must wait for the new vanguard to replace the old vanguard). Others will “lose faith” and go seeking for that fabled legitimacy elsewhere – they’ll just find the same, I reckon. And yet others will do something with the evidence and use it to see their traditions in a different and more honest light.

Fiction may not be true, but it can still be meaningful and inspirational. If this weren’t the case, all science fiction and fantasy would just shrivel up and die. And most religion too, I shouldn’t wonder! I’m reminded of what AMORC says about their history that it “may be divided into two general classifications: traditional and chronological. The traditional history consists of mystical allegories and fascinating legends that have been passed down for centuries by word of mouth. The Rosicrucian Order’s chronological accounts are based on specific dates and verifiable facts.”

“Traditional” accounts of Druidry may be found in Iolo Morganwg’s Barddas or Ross Nichols’ The Book of Druidry (a related account of the latter may be found here). A chronological account would be Ronald Hutton’s Blood and Mistletoe, which effectively dismantles the historical legitimacy of the previous two, but doesn’t quite strip away their value, bringing it more into focus, but only if viewed creatively, through the lens of Awen and applicability.

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2141
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby treegod » 11 Sep 2015, 10:18

Last one (for the moment). :)

Druidic Inspiration: Fantasy and Function
Nothing is real in Druidry? Indeed, nothing, but that is the challenge of any modern movement, religion or spirituality – our ideas, theories and fantasies need to be applied in the living world and have a relevance in our lives. This relevance needs to be proved in the world and the lives of people, i.e. have a function. They are not real in themselves – they need to be made real.

How, though? What is its value in the modern world? We can rule out historicity, but after that is anyone’s guess/invention. There are fraternal druids with social, charitable and philanthropic themes, cultural druids that use it to celebrate and strengthen their Celtic identities, activist druids that see it as a way to make changes in the world and spiritual/religious druids that seek to reconstruct, revive or reconnect with ancestral ways as they imagine it. These continue because they have value for someone in some way.

My own Druidry is of a spiritual stripe, combining reverence of nature with inner human development. The definition that most rings true to me comes from the Ancient Order of Druids in America which “understands Druidry as a path of nature spirituality and inner transformation founded on personal experience rather than dogmatic belief.”

In Druidry I found a path that turns towards nature instead of turning away from it, a quality that is vital in our age of ecological crisis, it also allowed me to experiment and investigate my beliefs without passively following an arbitrary list of them, and with this comes my own inner healing and development. I am a being with a lot of potential, and this, for the sake of myself, humanity and the world, needs to be developed and allowed to breathe. Other spiritual traditions also contain these, but its myths, archetypes and images developed out of a Western mindset and so are suited to a Western mindset, so we don’t need to seek out and appropriate exotic paths – we can find what we need “at home”.

As I said in my article on the Three Functions of Druidry “My interest in Druidry is mainly about what their function and role was within society and how that image can inspire the role of Druidry today.” I think the image of the ancient druid speaks to us and shows a powerful figure of authority and wisdom that is at the same time a nature mystic, at harmony with nature. This image, true or not, is inspiring and continues to inspire, which is nice and everything but…

is it really real? For me, as a “druid-in-training” this is an ongoing process and a lifetime’s work. Druidry is nothing if it cannot be effective and of service to the world.

User avatar
DaRC
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 4845
Joined: 06 Feb 2003, 17:13
Gender: Male
Location: Sussex
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby DaRC » 11 Sep 2015, 11:46

|-) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7q_0GzbzQUU
Many modern druid traditions can be traced back to Iolo Morganwg (amongst others), but they've taken on a life of their own since then.
To an extent and yet Iolo took inspiration from older traditions... I suppose what irks me, and this says more about me than you guys :oops:, is that the term fantasy is used by some to be dismissive of any spiritual experience or relevant historical continuum to the modern day.
For example, for many years the Irish Book of Invasions/Lebor Gabála Érenn was dismissed by a Victorian Christian culture as fantastical stories, the product of a primitive fevered oral tradition. Now archaeology is suggesting that there is plenty of fact mixed in with the fiction and the people were not primitive but had a vibrant and complex culture.
An atheist friend of mine likes to dismiss all of these stories, including the Bible, Quran, Vedas as just 'fairy stories' or fantasies that people just made up. This dismissive attitude I find as shallow and a dangerous pattern of thought. For me the Bible and Quran (and the Epic of the Kings https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shahnameh) are the histories of the people of the Levant and explains their mindset.
Just as a mix of the Norse and Celtic stories are the histories of the people of North Western Europe and explain our mindset and mosty modern fantasy literature is heavily rooted, whether knowingly or not, in these stories.

To continue my stream of thought - the use of the term fantasy is used by our dominant pseudo-scienctific world to consign anything it doesn't like to the scrapheap of non-reality or in extremis by psychiatrists to physically place people in the madhouse.
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
http://gewessiman.blogspot.co.uk Image

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2141
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby treegod » 11 Sep 2015, 12:19

I find fantasy a valuable and essential part of human existence, and I don't care how rational someone makes themselves out to be, they are still subject to "fantastical" thinking imo (perhaps even more than those who embrace it). I would say I find more meaningfulness and value in LOTR than some Celtic myths or the Bible. Its advantage is that it is relatively modern and resonates more with a modern mindset and yet still retains archaic and "fantastical" elements.

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2141
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Druid in Training

Postby treegod » 13 Sep 2015, 18:34

Truth Against the World
"Truth Against the World” is the motto of Iolo Morganwg, inventor of many of modern Druidry’s traditions. I just want to take a little time to examine what it means, and why I’m only recently contemplating it seriously.

The mystics say “abandon the world” which can be understood well… or not at all. Usually it is understood as the Earth or nature, so spirituality became associated with something “above and beyond” the world of matter. Ecologically speaking, this has been a disaster, hence my reluctance to accept Iolo’s motto. We really don’t want to add to the anti-nature attitudes that have done great damage to our world.

But I think the hermits had it (partly) right. They abandoned society and sought out isolated places in nature. They were tired of hypocrisy and the myriad fantasies that people called “reality”. Apparently only the trees, rocks, birds and weather talk sense – everything else is rubbish; they speak the “truth against the world”. A cold cave is a cold cave, it won’t pretend to be anything else.

But the world is getting smaller, and we can’t really abandon the human world physically like the hermits did. It’s also not going to make things any better – you leave behind society, and though you may feel better (partially), society certainly won’t. But our “abandonment” of society shouldn’t be physical (even if it is tempting) since being anti-social is also damaging, and you’ll always carry a little bit of society with you. The abandoment has to be a lot more subtle than that.

I’m reminded of the Matrix films, and taking the red pill and the blue pill. Once you take the red pill and realise the truth that “everything is a lie” you don’t need to leave the world of egos and appearances behind, you just need to learn to navigate it without losing yourself. You can enter or exit the Matrix/world/society at will, work within it or work outside of it, without announcing your subversion or being detected by THEM! (“them” is pretty much anyone that has a vested/egoistic interest in Society, which is pretty much everyone). You maintain the ego as a Useful Tool, but not a Fundamental Reality.

Most people think of themselves as egos that drive bodies around, which is a Lie Against Nature. The beginning of the Truth Against the World is the realisation that we are bodies carrying egos. If we all started thinking like that, the world would be an extremely different place! (and hermits would come flocking back to society in droves… if they notice anything happening outside their cave, that is).


Return to “Discuss Druidry”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests