Technology in Druidry

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Mistanlyn
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Technology in Druidry

Postby Mistanlyn » 17 Aug 2015, 19:10

I'm not sure this is the proper place to post, but I am curious about how people incorporate technology into Druidry if they do? We live in such a technological world now, where we have access to the internet through our phones and so forth.

So what can one do to connect technology to their Druid practices?
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"We often forget that we are nature.
Nature is not something separate from us.
So when we say that we have lost our connection to nature,
we’ve lost our connection to ourselves."

- Andy Goldsworthy

"o hear the voice of the bard
who present, past and future sees
whose ears have heard the holy word
that walked among the ancient trees…"

- William Blake, First Song of Experience

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DJ Droood
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Re: Technology in Druidry

Postby DJ Droood » 18 Aug 2015, 01:54

So what can one do to connect technology to their Druid practices?
I use a calendar....on my android phone.
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Green Raven
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Re: Technology in Druidry

Postby Green Raven » 19 Aug 2015, 12:19

I am deeply indebted to online libraries of ancient and rare texts. But like all resources, some studious checking for accuracy, authenticity and personal agendas never goes amiss.
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Weatherwax
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Re: Technology in Druidry

Postby Weatherwax » 19 Aug 2015, 13:26

I use technology A LOT. For one thing, I have no physical contact with others on this path where I live, so my communication regarding these subjects is almost completely online. I'm active in the social media in any case because of some cultural projects we do and I spend a lot of time with computers in general (always have, since I was a small child.)

I do LOVE being in nature, alas, where I live it's hard to come by. I live in the metropolitan center of a very big and famously non-green city (Istanbul) and most of the time I cannot even see the sky clearly. I have two stargazing apps, which I had hoped to use in aiding me identify constellations etc. but mostly I just look at the screen itself :) there's not much to see from all the light pollution. I also have a phases of the moon app, for the same reason. High rise buildings+smog+light pollution makes it very hard to observe the sky.

That said, I am happy with technology. I'm not happy with its irresponsible use and lack of natural spaces but generally science and medicine and all sorts of techs are marvels for me. Of course, if I could observe the moon from my house each night, I'd rather track its phases with my own eyes. I also wouldn't have to use "nature sounds" playlists if I could just find a nice quiet place in nature where I could meditate.
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Mistanlyn
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Re: Technology in Druidry

Postby Mistanlyn » 19 Aug 2015, 16:08

I use technology A LOT. For one thing, I have no physical contact with others on this path where I live, so my communication regarding these subjects is almost completely online. I'm active in the social media in any case because of some cultural projects we do and I spend a lot of time with computers in general (always have, since I was a small child.)

I do LOVE being in nature, alas, where I live it's hard to come by. I live in the metropolitan center of a very big and famously non-green city (Istanbul) and most of the time I cannot even see the sky clearly. I have two stargazing apps, which I had hoped to use in aiding me identify constellations etc. but mostly I just look at the screen itself :) there's not much to see from all the light pollution. I also have a phases of the moon app, for the same reason. High rise buildings+smog+light pollution makes it very hard to observe the sky.

That said, I am happy with technology. I'm not happy with its irresponsible use and lack of natural spaces but generally science and medicine and all sorts of techs are marvels for me. Of course, if I could observe the moon from my house each night, I'd rather track its phases with my own eyes. I also wouldn't have to use "nature sounds" playlists if I could just find a nice quiet place in nature where I could meditate.
I can totally relate to the first part. I live out of the way of a lot of places (to get to the nearest town for shopping is 30 minutes away, nearest cities after that are 45 minutes and an hour away). So I also use technology to connect with others online. I also use the internet for my education, since anxiety makes it hard to get out and deal with people (and of course, the location I'm at with no colleges around). To me, technology does have its uses (and downfalls), and I think there can be a connection between it and nature. I use my camera for photography when I'm out and about in a nature area, and then upload it online for others to see and enjoy. I use my computer to write most of the time, because it's hard on my hands to always write with pen/pencil and paper. I use my computer to listen to music as well, which I am almost always doing.
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"We often forget that we are nature.
Nature is not something separate from us.
So when we say that we have lost our connection to nature,
we’ve lost our connection to ourselves."

- Andy Goldsworthy

"o hear the voice of the bard
who present, past and future sees
whose ears have heard the holy word
that walked among the ancient trees…"

- William Blake, First Song of Experience

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Sciethe
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Re: Technology in Druidry

Postby Sciethe » 19 Aug 2015, 23:08

I'm not sure this is the proper place to post, but I am curious about how people incorporate technology into Druidry if they do? We live in such a technological world now, where we have access to the internet through our phones and so forth.
So what can one do to connect technology to their Druid practices?
Hi Mistanlyn :shake:
Technology is a part of being human, an IPhone is after all a tool to get a job done- just more efficient than a drum, say, or a smoke signal. If you look back at the first tool users it is thought that we've been into tools for over a million years, and there are those that define tool use in hominids as the beginning of true humanity. They are at least as much a part of our nature as speech, cooking fires, and more a part of us than the relatively new phenomenon of agriculture which has many Gods and Goddesses associated with it.

A microcomputer/tablet/phone is a complex tool with a number of simple functions which it performs very well, and it is as well when using things like this to reflect on that simplicity: image fixing (saves on paper and charcoal) writing (ditto) exploring and questioning (saves getting your bull*hit from village elders) and communicating (means that carefully considered responses can be given).

...but in the end these mind boggling devices are built to be tuned to those things which are intrinsic to our human natures. Given that we have at least seen a rock, felt the wind on our face, known glory in the amazing beauties of nature there is no reason why our Druid practices cannot at least in part be carried out through them.

I'm looking right now at a prototype beam splitter which was the invention that made digital recording possible, made by the hands of my father-in-law: a most remarkable Druid who saw a practical application for the direction of light and was a fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society. A love of the Universe such as his, a fascination with its workings is a particular kind of reverence. Dave the Bard would be pleased with this one, as would anyone who has heard his songs and sung along to Sons and Daughters of Robin Hood in the car :D

Reconstructionism is all very well in its way, but we must live in our own time too.
Sciethe
For in his morning orisons he loves the sun and the sun loves him. For he is of the tribe of Tiger. Christopher Smart

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Re: Technology in Druidry

Postby mandybard » 20 Aug 2015, 06:45

It's going to sound bizarre but if it weren't for technology I would not be studying druidry! Well, maybe I would but I doubt I would've had the opportunity to find out about OBOD, connect with a formal course of study and become part of this amazing community.

I would almost suggest that it is a rather druidic thing to do to embrace technology as the tool that it is, because it gives us access to so much more of that which we seek to learn - we're meant to be a studious bunch, let's take every chance we can get!

That being said, it's undeniable that so much about what technology is used for can be overwhelming and depressing at times. But remember there is always room in the day/week/month to take time out from it and concentrate on those vital aspects of life that don't revolve around it.
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Every moment, lightly shaken, ran itself in golden sands.
Love took up the harp of Life, and smote on all the chords with might;
Smote the chord of Self, that, trembling, pass'd in music out of sight.
(from Locksley Hall by Alfred Lord Tennyson)

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Acacia
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Re: Technology in Druidry

Postby Acacia » 26 Aug 2015, 01:37

Like Weatherwax I also use technology A LOT. Love it. :) When doing rituals I type them up on the computer, then transfer them to my iPhone. It especially works well when any part of the ritual needs to be done in total darkness. Easy to turn the screen off when necessary, then back on with reduced brightness and no need for a light. I also transfer any meditations that are on the Gwersi CDs to the phone. This way I can press 'Pause' on the earphones when I want more time with any particular parts of the meditations. :)
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Whoever knows how to listen to them
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Mistanlyn
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Re: Technology in Druidry

Postby Mistanlyn » 28 Aug 2015, 19:45

It's going to sound bizarre but if it weren't for technology I would not be studying druidry! Well, maybe I would but I doubt I would've had the opportunity to find out about OBOD, connect with a formal course of study and become part of this amazing community.
Honestly, I cannot agree with this statement more. If it weren't for the internet and computers, I wouldn't be on this path, I wouldn't have found the OBOD, and I would still be lost with my spirituality, no doubt.
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https://earthlyandethereal.wordpress.com/
"We often forget that we are nature.
Nature is not something separate from us.
So when we say that we have lost our connection to nature,
we’ve lost our connection to ourselves."

- Andy Goldsworthy

"o hear the voice of the bard
who present, past and future sees
whose ears have heard the holy word
that walked among the ancient trees…"

- William Blake, First Song of Experience

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Mistanlyn
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Re: Technology in Druidry

Postby Mistanlyn » 28 Aug 2015, 19:47

Like Weatherwax I also use technology A LOT. Love it. :) When doing rituals I type them up on the computer, then transfer them to my iPhone. It especially works well when any part of the ritual needs to be done in total darkness. Easy to turn the screen off when necessary, then back on with reduced brightness and no need for a light. I also transfer any meditations that are on the Gwersi CDs to the phone. This way I can press 'Pause' on the earphones when I want more time with any particular parts of the meditations. :)
You know, I never thought to do some of this. Especially the meditations on the phone portion. I have music on my phone that I listen to with headphones sometimes, but never thought to find meditation music or sounds to put on it for meditation. Especially if I could go outside and lay in the grass or something. I'd still have technology available to me (especially if something were to happen), but I'd also be out in nature instead of trying to meditate in my small room.

I like to hand write my thoughts onto paper first, but I've been doing a bit of transferring things onto the computer. With my divination and witchcraft practices, I've been using Evernote to help me organize and keep track of specific materials.
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https://earthlyandethereal.wordpress.com/
"We often forget that we are nature.
Nature is not something separate from us.
So when we say that we have lost our connection to nature,
we’ve lost our connection to ourselves."

- Andy Goldsworthy

"o hear the voice of the bard
who present, past and future sees
whose ears have heard the holy word
that walked among the ancient trees…"

- William Blake, First Song of Experience


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