What are you sowing, what are you harvesting?

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illion
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Re: What are you sowing, what are you harvesting?

Postby illion » 22 Jan 2015, 06:13

Shadowcat, you seem to be a lot wiser than me! While I am blinded by the desire for more money in, you actually address the underlying aspects of not having enough :grin:

I guess it will not help to get more money in, if it all goes out again :old:

I think I will need to sow something that I can store.

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ShadowCat
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Re: What are you sowing, what are you harvesting?

Postby ShadowCat » 22 Jan 2015, 09:10

Shadowcat, you seem to be a lot wiser than me!
Nah, I wouldn't call myself wise by any means, except the dutch "eigen-wijs" which literally is "wise about your self" but is used mostly in the sense of "pigheaded/stubborn" :grin:

Also, even when I can think about it and phrase it nicely the challenge of living those words is something else. I posted it here as a reminder to myself. And while this energetic/mental/emotional/physical process takes place my guy and me also sit together daily crunching numbers and discussing things like marketing and sales for our business and generally worrieing about the future :oops:

It's not about doing one thing. Just like a modern farmer who has sown all his acres with the same potato is very dependend on money and very vulnarable for blight destroying all he owns, so are people who have this single thing going for them (most often a good job) vulnarable. It is my personal feeling that to survive the global economic changes happening around us, that we need multiple things: skills to take care of ourselves, a decent income to keep in touch with mainstream society, a means of clean water and food, friends and a general sense of flexibility. You might want to look in to (urban) homesteading and also into minimalismblogs like zenhabits for inspiration on how to live richer with less. :hug:
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illion
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Re: What are you sowing, what are you harvesting?

Postby illion » 25 Jan 2015, 10:37

Oh, dear ShadowCat, I just love the simple living philosophy :cloud9: It is just that it is not so easy with a ten year old son in the house :D

I truly live simple and I am really happy about it. I don't need a lot of stuff or fancy new clothes all the time, although I have to say that I like to spend money on new hiking outfit if I have the chance. I am just not so good at making simple choices for my son. I want him to keep up with the others, because I know how difficult it is to not be one of the "boys". I try not to put much emphasis on clothes and brands yet, and he doesn't seem to care, but when it comes to sports and data :oops: I want him to have what he needs so he can keep up with his community. I try to tell him that he needs to spend his own money on stuff I don't think is necessary, and he therefore wish to have money for Christmas and his birthday. Money he spends on what I call "cool" but unnecessary stuff, like getting his own server for "Minecraft" gaming for example.

Oh, it is really difficult I think..

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Re: What are you sowing, what are you harvesting?

Postby DaRC » 26 Jan 2015, 14:00

"pigheaded/stubborn"
:grin: Ahh down here in Sussex we're renowned for it, described in our county saying
"You can push and you can shove but a Sussex pig won't be druv." (dialect for driven)
I want him to keep up with the others, because I know how difficult it is to not be one of the "boys".
Yes it is really difficult, our son has a similar issue in that he goes to a private school where so many of his peers' parents are very rich.
We try to teach him to value money but whenever he does have money it seems to "burn a hole in his pocket" as we say over here... meaning he spends it on things he doesn't really need rather than saving it.
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
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illion
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Re: What are you sowing, what are you harvesting?

Postby illion » 27 Jan 2015, 18:53

And when it comes to sports equipment...

I really want him to become a healthy and active boy, and I know that if you are to like f.ex cycling, your bike has to be good. If you ride on an old one from my younger years, and the other boys all have brand new fancy mountain bikes, you are doomed to not like cycling. Same goes with skiing, cross country and down hill. Oh, dear. We've had our struggles with this, I can assure you.

I am happy he got so early interested in artistic gymnastics. He was only six years old, when he chose that over all else, and I thought: "Fine, you don't need five pairs of skis or any expensive equipment for that!" Well, now we spend just as much money and probably a lot more on coaches. When he was taken out to train on high level, it became really expensive. But at least it is not money spent on things, and he can build further on his knowledge of gymnastics later if he chooses not to be active when he gets older. And most importantly: The smile on his face every time he learns new skills. It is really priceless.

So, we've switchted our spending from things to coaches. I guess it is better after all :grin:


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