The Germanic Path

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anigreenwood
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Re: The Germanic Path

Postby anigreenwood » 03 Feb 2013, 15:34

For the interest of those who stumble on this thread as I did, several years after it dissolved or moved over somewhere, there are several significant books now on Norseidhr which I also recommend:

Diana Paxson - Taking Up the RUnes, Tranceportation - and her Wodin's Children trilogy. You get a sense of her spiritual kinship with that God of inspiration from the latter especially. As well, her Brisingamen (fiction)

Hilda Davidson - HR Ellis Davidson - Myth and Symbols of Pagan Europe; and Gods and Symbols of Northern Europe

Patricia Lafayllve has an excellent handbook, Freyja, Lady, vanadis: an introduction to the goddess. She and Paxson are both long time practicing heathens.

Jenny Blain Seidh

Britt-Mari Nasstom The Great Goddess of the North: Freyja

Best,

Ani

Cyneric
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Re: The Germanic Path

Postby Cyneric » 17 Mar 2013, 22:40

I am interested in both Anglo-Saxon and Celtic (Welsh and pre Anglo-Saxon England). Is it possible to celebrate the traditions and faiths of both without one or the other being compromised, or should I focus on one or the other?
As a Saxon Pagan myself, I would recommend the books by Alaric Albertsson: "Travels Through Middle-Earth" and "Wyrdworking: The Path of the Saxon Sorcerer."

In these books Alaric outlines the training, practice, and beliefs of the Saxon Drymann (druid) and their magic (drycraeft).

I would *love* to see senior OBOD-ers either integrating material like this into the coursework, or creating another series of courses around the Saxon path! :-)

Cyneric Wulf / Saxon Drymann

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Explorer
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Re: The Germanic Path

Postby Explorer » 18 Mar 2013, 08:06

I am interested in both Anglo-Saxon and Celtic (Welsh and pre Anglo-Saxon England). Is it possible to celebrate the traditions and faiths of both without one or the other being compromised, or should I focus on one or the other?
As a Saxon Pagan myself, I would recommend the books by Alaric Albertsson: "Travels Through Middle-Earth" and "Wyrdworking: The Path of the Saxon Sorcerer."

In these books Alaric outlines the training, practice, and beliefs of the Saxon Drymann (druid) and their magic (drycraeft).

I would *love* to see senior OBOD-ers either integrating material like this into the coursework, or creating another series of courses around the Saxon path! :-)

Cyneric Wulf / Saxon Drymann
We are kind of trying that on this facebook group called 'OBOD Wyrd':
https://www.facebook.com/groups/457945784244925/
(it is a closed group, but OBODies and seriously interested folks are welcome).
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence

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Cyneric
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Re: The Germanic Path

Postby Cyneric » 18 Mar 2013, 12:07

I am interested in both Anglo-Saxon and Celtic (Welsh and pre Anglo-Saxon England). Is it possible to celebrate the traditions and faiths of both without one or the other being compromised, or should I focus on one or the other?
As a Saxon Pagan myself, I would recommend the books by Alaric Albertsson: "Travels Through Middle-Earth" and "Wyrdworking: The Path of the Saxon Sorcerer."

In these books Alaric outlines the training, practice, and beliefs of the Saxon Drymann (druid) and their magic (drycraeft).

I would *love* to see senior OBOD-ers either integrating material like this into the coursework, or creating another series of courses around the Saxon path! :-)

Cyneric Wulf / Saxon Drymann
We are kind of trying that on this facebook group called 'OBOD Wyrd':
https://www.facebook.com/groups/457945784244925/
(it is a closed group, but OBODies and seriously interested folks are welcome).
Fantastic! Just requested to join (James Foster).

I'mboth seriously interested, as well as a brand new (as of yesterday!) OBOD member.

Cyneric

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DaRC
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Re: The Germanic Path

Postby DaRC » 18 Mar 2013, 12:15

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Alaric-Albertsson/e/B001USKN9O
http://www.alaricalbertsson.com/
Just adding a link to Amazon for the books.
We are kind of trying that on this facebook group called 'OBOD Wyrd':
https://www.facebook.com/groups/457945784244925/
(it is a closed group, but OBODies and seriously interested folks are welcome).
It sounds very much like my Gewessi path - but I don't do Facebook (for professional reasons...) 8-)
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
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Cosmic55
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Re: The Germanic Path

Postby Cosmic55 » 27 Feb 2014, 22:32

We are kind of trying that on this facebook group called 'OBOD Wyrd':
https://www.facebook.com/groups/457945784244925/
(it is a closed group, but OBODies and seriously interested folks are welcome).
I am seriously considering joining Facebook just to see what's up with this. Is it still active?
“This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.”

― William Shakespeare, Hamlet

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DaRC
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Re: The Germanic Path

Postby DaRC » 28 Feb 2014, 14:46

try pm'ing Explorer to check.
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
http://gewessiman.blogspot.co.uk Image

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MountainGnome
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Re: The Germanic Path

Postby MountainGnome » 26 Sep 2014, 18:37

I admit I haven't read this entire thread, but I wonder if anyone has brought up the Indo-European culture as a whole yet.


If you REALLY want to trace German roots back, look at the language. German is an Indo-European language, just like the Celtic languages, Romance languages, Slavic languages, and Persian and Indian languages (Persian, Urdu, Sanskrit, Punjabi, etc.).

So this tells you something: all of the people who speak Indo-European languages have some kind of common historical and cultural background, even if it has become very diversified over the millenia since then.


It all goes back to the early Indo-European civilizations, and this seems to center around the people who were in the Bible called the Hittites. They lived around northeastern Turkey, around the Caucasus Mountains. The Goths and Celts would later return to Turkey and set up cities like Galatia (named after the Gauls), though this part of the world usually isn't associated with Germanic or Celtic cultures. The Hittites seem to have been a largely tall and white population, and possibly very war-like. In the biblical story where David has an affair with the wife of one of his military officers while that officer was leading a war, the military officer was a Hittite leading the Hebrews.


Long story short, some other civilizations got together and annihilated the Hittite civilization in Turkey some time around 1500 BC. After this, the Hittite people made a mass exodus, seemingly in all directions. Primarily they migrated across northern Europe (where they became known as Celts and Goths), west across the Mediterranean (where they were known as Trojans, Etruscans, Greeks, and later became Romans), and to the southeast to modern-day India, where they were called the Aryans.


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