Tin Whistle

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BlazeLeeDragon
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Tin Whistle

Postby BlazeLeeDragon » 11 Jun 2016, 15:29

Recently I purchased a Tin Whistle in key of D, an item I have been considering for a while now. Anyone else play? I'm new to music, tried a few keys on the piano before, violin for a year in highschool. Purchased several plastic recorders over the years. The Tin Whistle I purchased is a cheap 13 USD one with a booklet. Nothing major but so far I'm rather enjoying it.
May the peace of the season find you,
Blaze Dragon


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malcolmb
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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby malcolmb » 11 Jun 2016, 15:59

Recently I purchased a Tin Whistle in key of D, an item I have been considering for a while now. Anyone else play? I'm new to music, tried a few keys on the piano before, violin for a year in highschool. Purchased several plastic recorders over the years. The Tin Whistle I purchased is a cheap 13 USD one with a booklet. Nothing major but so far I'm rather enjoying it.
I did once have a go about four decades ago and found it quite easy to produce a simple tune but when you watch the experts, it really is a versatile instrument capable of very complex tunes. I am sure you have already Googled tin whistle for lessons (I wish Google had have been around when I was twenty!) but this seems a helpful site with some good advice:

http://www.irish-folk-songs.com/learnin ... istle.html

Have fun!
Peaceful Earth Grove: http://www.peacefulearthgrove.com/


My original "Druid Music" CDs (all proceeds to the charity "Pagan Aid":
https://lylemusic.bandcamp.com/

My original Celtic / Folk / Jazz music at:
http://www.soundclick.com/lylemusic
http://www.soundclick.com/malcolmbrown
http://www.youtube.com/user/LyleMusic

“So many Gods, so many creeds, so many paths that wind and wind. While just the art of being kind, is all the sad world needs.” Ella Wheeler Wilcox

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Badger Bob
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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby Badger Bob » 12 Jun 2016, 10:55

I play the whistle, mainly because I used to head out wandering a couple of times a year and a tin whistle is about the only instrument that can survive sleeping rough in the English countryside. Ceolas seems to still be up although not maintained anymore, there are lots of familiar traditional tunes on there (which can greatly improve your chance of a free pint at open mic nights). You can play pretty much anything on a whistle once you have mastered half-stopping to get the fiddly notes in between the holes, cuts and crans are easy but make you sound as if you know what you are doing. My advice is to get a decent tutorial book for the basics, the ones that come with the instrument are usually a bit sparse on the details, and everything else can come from experimentation, watching other whistlers and youtube.

Oh, and you are going to want a low whistle sooner or later, they sound chuffing fantastic...

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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby Dogrose » 12 Jun 2016, 22:20

I play though I'm very slack when it comes to practicing so I'm not terribly good. I do find it fairly easy and if you learn from as book you learn to read music at the same time if you can't already. I wanted a low whistle for ages and eventually bought a Low D with some birthday money but I have mild arthritis in my wrists and can't quite hold the angle needed to play, very disappointing as I think they sound wonderful!

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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby Coillte » 14 Jun 2016, 20:04

I was forced to learn in school and developed a dislike as a result. Now that I have gotten over myself, I'd like a low whistle - it's the cello of the whistle world - ghostly and warm.
"Glaine Ár gCroí, Neart Ár nGéag Is Beart Dá Réir Ár mBriathar"

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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby LittleAcorn » 14 Jun 2016, 20:47

I have a couple of tin whistles. I think they're a really versatile instrument. I'm absoloutly fascinated by musical instruments and own over 30 different instruments. I picked up my tin whistle on a trip to Ireland about 8 years ago :)
"I live my life in growing orbits, which move out over the things of the world. I am circling around God, around the ancient tower, and I have been circling for a thousand years, and I still don't know if I'm a falcon, or a storm, or a great song." - Rilke

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chrono
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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby chrono » 05 Jul 2016, 14:31

Can anyone here offer any advice on what to look for in a tin whistle for someone who's never played one? I've read that a tin whistle is tuned to a specific key and that to buy a pair of them in the D and C keys should allow one to play virtually all Celtic music... Anything else a beginner should look for other than that? Any issues of quality of materials or other concerns to be wary of especially if I'm looking to order such whistles online? Perhaps even internationally if I can't find a Canadian supplier?

Thanks so much for any insight you can offer!

Blessed be,


Chris

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malcolmb
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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby malcolmb » 05 Jul 2016, 15:45

Hi Chris - I did play tin whistle a bit when I was in my teens and twenties - a long time ago - as well as a range of folk-related instruments. A quick Google search shows that you can spend a lot of money on even a relatively simple instrument like a tin whistle. My advice is "Don't"! As a beginner, aim to get a basic one for the least money possible. Learning any instrument takes time and dedication and I am sure many tin whistles end up forgotten in the back of a drawer. But if you find you enjoy the instrument, fine. That is the time to think about spending a bit more. My first guitar was a free and very old G Clef found in a friend's attic where the back was held on with tape and the fret board closely resembled the Himalayas Mountains! Had a lovely (and unique!) tone. Worth every penny I didn't pay for it!

Some good advice here:

https://thesession.org/discussions/29470

And a few examples of how they sound here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Z4P8ZWK-60
Peaceful Earth Grove: http://www.peacefulearthgrove.com/


My original "Druid Music" CDs (all proceeds to the charity "Pagan Aid":
https://lylemusic.bandcamp.com/

My original Celtic / Folk / Jazz music at:
http://www.soundclick.com/lylemusic
http://www.soundclick.com/malcolmbrown
http://www.youtube.com/user/LyleMusic

“So many Gods, so many creeds, so many paths that wind and wind. While just the art of being kind, is all the sad world needs.” Ella Wheeler Wilcox

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BlazeLeeDragon
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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby BlazeLeeDragon » 05 Jul 2016, 23:48

Can anyone here offer any advice on what to look for in a tin whistle for someone who's never played one? I've read that a tin whistle is tuned to a specific key and that to buy a pair of them in the D and C keys should allow one to play virtually all Celtic music... Anything else a beginner should look for other than that? Any issues of quality of materials or other concerns to be wary of especially if I'm looking to order such whistles online? Perhaps even internationally if I can't find a Canadian supplier?

Thanks so much for any insight you can offer!

Blessed be,


Chris

I started with a Tin Whistle in the key of D. Bought off amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/Waltons-Irish-Wh ... in+whistle

Most help I've had was viewing youtube videos on how to play little beginner songs. I like to be able to hear as I try to play, in an attempt to mimic what I hear and get the pace down. I still can't read music, it's like it's own language. Luckly there are tons of free sheet music for beginners if you search online for tin whistle sheet music.
May the peace of the season find you,
Blaze Dragon


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chrono
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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby chrono » 07 Jul 2016, 02:27

Thanks for the information!

Searching Amazon shows several inexpensive whistles that I can choose among. :-)

Blessed be,


Chris

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BlazeLeeDragon
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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby BlazeLeeDragon » 07 Jul 2016, 03:25

Thanks for the information!

Searching Amazon shows several inexpensive whistles that I can choose among. :-)

Blessed be,


Chris

indeed, they are not perfect but since your just starting out...why not. As mentioned mine is in key of D which seems to be recommended for most Irish tunes. I would probably start their, maybe look up some fun songs. I like "concerning hobbits" on the tin whistle, and "scarborough fair" as two of my favorites to play. I also found star wars and misty mountain cold. There are tons but those are some of my favorites to play so far.
May the peace of the season find you,
Blaze Dragon


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feadogai
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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby feadogai » 09 Mar 2017, 05:42

I am a little late to post on this thread, but maybe I can help out anyway. I have played Irish trad on whistle and Irish flute for about ten years now and came to this music and instrumentation from recorder and before that trombone and other brass. Good whistles for beginners are Feadog, Oak, Walton's, and Generations. All of these should be gotten in the key of D and should cost fifteen dollars or less from ebay or pretty much anywhere. If you want to spend a little more, you can get a "tweaked" (slightly modified to provide better performance characteristics) on ebay for about thirty dollars from Jerry Freeman. I like the Freeman whistles a lot. I suggest learning everything by ear. Music is made for ears, and although it takes a little work to train your ears to learn without reading you will reap great benefits from removing extra processes from the act of making music. My favorite tutor to buy is from Cathal McConnell on Homespun. His presentation may seem a little rustic, but the content of his lessons is spot-on and he was a great musician. https://www.homespun.com/instructors/cathal-mcconnell/. If you can't afford or do not want to buy a tutor, watch Ryan G. Duns on youtube. Scroll down to the bottom of his uploaded videos list to watch his lessons from week one. He does a really good job and is a very good player. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0Xf1Ume0zA. He starts with the tune "Mary Had a Little Lamb" which is strange to me, but the point is to start by training your ear with something you know without struggling to remember an unfamiliar tune. :idea:
Seek not to follow in the footsteps of the masters. Seek what they sought.
Matsuo Basho

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Heddwen
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Re: Tin Whistle

Postby Heddwen » 09 Mar 2017, 08:44

I am a little late to post on this thread, but maybe I can help out anyway. I have played Irish trad on whistle and Irish flute for about ten years now and came to this music and instrumentation from recorder and before that trombone and other brass. Good whistles for beginners are Feadog, Oak, Walton's, and Generations. All of these should be gotten in the key of D and should cost fifteen dollars or less from ebay or pretty much anywhere. If you want to spend a little more, you can get a "tweaked" (slightly modified to provide better performance characteristics) on ebay for about thirty dollars from Jerry Freeman. I like the Freeman whistles a lot. I suggest learning everything by ear. Music is made for ears, and although it takes a little work to train your ears to learn without reading you will reap great benefits from removing extra processes from the act of making music. My favorite tutor to buy is from Cathal McConnell on Homespun. His presentation may seem a little rustic, but the content of his lessons is spot-on and he was a great musician. https://www.homespun.com/instructors/cathal-mcconnell/. If you can't afford or do not want to buy a tutor, watch Ryan G. Duns on youtube. Scroll down to the bottom of his uploaded videos list to watch his lessons from week one. He does a really good job and is a very good player. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0Xf1Ume0zA. He starts with the tune "Mary Had a Little Lamb" which is strange to me, but the point is to start by training your ear with something you know without struggling to remember an unfamiliar tune. :idea:

Thanks for your input here and welcome, feadogai :shake:


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