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Bendigeidfran, the Giant King

Posted: 26 Nov 2010, 18:40
by Peter Freeman
This story has always fascinated me since I heard it as a child. As I got older I came to realise that this was a story about being a bridge between worlds. The Welsh proverb used today "Tra bod ben bid bont" To be a leader be a bridge originated with this tale. It also talks about the cauldron of re-birth that features in Arthurian tales as well as this one. There are some deep ramifications to this legend that give many clues to the ancient mysteries. Unravelling those hidden secrets is a challenge and my personal quest. It's also a damn good yarn,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frlMIgOiuAI

Re: Bendigeidfran, the Giant King

Posted: 26 Nov 2010, 19:05
by DJ Droood
wow...what synchronicity...not a moment ago, I was reading an op-ed piece about Ireland's economy and the author mentioned their "Bendigeidfranian debt" and I wondered what the heck that meant...then I came on here to cleanse my mind and here was an explaination!

Re: Bendigeidfran, the Giant King

Posted: 04 Jun 2011, 05:57
by Somniferia
Giants are Giants, they usually keep to them selves and are very rich and advanced. Now days Giants of earth in the Somniparallel no wonder intersecting with other otherworlds as well have Giants advanced as well, to the point of about 500 000 years into the future where space science is very advanced and healing is not a problem.

:warm: :cloud9: :gloomy: :yay: :old:

:where:

Re: Bendigeidfran, the Giant King

Posted: 03 Mar 2013, 02:29
by Welsh Mythology
Yes, he points to a teaching on death that's sometimes hard to grasp on a first reading. I think there is much more to Bendigeidfran than the Second Branch reveals on the surface. He appears to be an ancestral guardian of the Dead in some ways, and a figure of great benevolence also.

Re: Bendigeidfran, the Giant King

Posted: 10 May 2014, 20:56
by Mannan
I always wondered about the link between the castle scene when Bran and his entourage enter in the Second Branch of the Mabinogion, and Irish tales such as the enigmatic and visionary 'Siege of Da Derga's Hostel'...

Re: Bendigeidfran, the Giant King

Posted: 01 Feb 2015, 02:45
by Welsh Mythology
I always wondered about the link between the castle scene when Bran and his entourage enter in the Second Branch of the Mabinogion, and Irish tales such as the enigmatic and visionary 'Siege of Da Derga's Hostel'...
Proinsias Mac Cana draws similar and other comparissons. (Branwen 1958)

As has been pointed out several times these last few decades, I also think the second branch needs to be read with an eye to Ystoria Taliesin, Preiddiau Annwfn and Arthur's visit to Ireland in Culhwch and Olwen. A similar motif is played with in the third branch when Pryderi and Rhiannon are punished. I think following and then collapsing all the similarities between all of these texts leads to a perception of the cauldron as a symbol from the bardic class, and the magical head as from the warrior class. A fo ben bid bont then takes on a whole new meaning, as BrĂ¢n inevitably bridges time as well as space, as well as ancestry.