Morrigan

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Morgan25
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Morrigan

Postby Morgan25 » 12 Dec 2010, 15:14

I am trying to find some info on Morrigan, but I cannot find much besides the little on random blurbs on mythology and wicca websites and the Mabinogion. Can anyone help with this? I also want to learn about the connection between Morgan Le Fay/Morgain and Morrigan.

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Re: Morrigan

Postby Huathe » 12 Dec 2010, 19:38

I will have to consult my books and look this up online and get back to you. The Morrigan is one of if not my favorite celtic mythological characters, rivalled only by the Dagda and Cernunnos.
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Re: Morrigan

Postby Morgan25 » 13 Dec 2010, 20:20

Well thank you very much, I appreciate it very much. I don't have many resources, besides the web at my disposal.

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Re: Morrigan

Postby skydove » 13 Dec 2010, 20:37

I was reading a label on a raven pendant just today so the info may not be too reliable but this is roughly what it said ;-
The Morrigan is the Celtic battle goddess who haunts fields of warfare choosing who to let live and who to call to her.
She can take the form of a raven to fly over the battlefields and the raven is thus associated as her symbol. She brings healing wisdom and the unfolding of mysteries to those who can still their mind enough to allow these gifts of light and insight to enter, so although associated with the darkness of death she can be seen as a bringer of light (a typical druidic way of looking at the world).
She is also known as 'The Washer at the Ford' where she washes the blood soaked garments of those who have fallen in battle/ or who are soon to die in battle.
If you get chance listen to Damh the Bard's 'The Morrigan' which will teach you as much as any piece of writing I think
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Re: Morrigan

Postby Aurora » 14 Dec 2010, 04:08

Hi Morgan25,

I love The Morrigan and found this book: The Guises of the Morrigan - The Irish Goddess of Sex & Battle by David Rankine, Sorita D'este to be wonderful resource
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DaRC
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Re: Morrigan

Postby DaRC » 14 Dec 2010, 20:57

A lot of old Celtic text translations are available at Sacred Texts. This is link refers to when Cuchulain met the Morrigan (part of the Cattle Raid of Cooley):
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/crc/crc27.htm
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Re: Morrigan

Postby Morgan25 » 15 Dec 2010, 12:20

Thanks DaRC. I already know the story, but I am always willing to read this stuff over, might learn something new. :)

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DaRC
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Re: Morrigan

Postby DaRC » 19 Dec 2010, 11:21

Ok I've looked up in Caitlin & John Matthews Encyclopaedia of Celtic Wisdom. The Morrighan is mentioned in the Book of Lismore where Finghein mac Luchta is visited by a faery woman who tells him where the headpiece of Briun is hidden, from the Morrighan, in the well of Sidh Cruachan.

Then the relationship with Cuchulain is explained - that the Morrighan, Goddess of War, desired him as her lover. His refusal to become her lover earns her jealous rage and eventually she causes his death. She appears in various shapes (a black eel, white heifer and grey wolf) and every time they meet Cuchulain injures her. Cuchulain ends up healing her whilst she is disguised as a milking cow with 3 teats.
It is this shape shifting & healing aspect that Geoffrey of Monmouth uses in his Arthurian Morgan whilst Mallory refers to the jealous stalker aspect in his Morgan Le Fay.

As a goddess of War, much like the Norse Freya, she is a woman of passion and with the power of life and death.
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
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Re: Morrigan

Postby chimera » 23 Dec 2010, 11:34

[Murugan...signify a brave warrior capable of killing evil beings to save the devoted.[6]
Sangam Tamil literature
Tolkappiyam, possibly the most ancient of the extant Sangam works, dated between the 3rd century BCE and 5th century CE glorified Murugan, " the red god seated on the blue peacock, who is ever young and resplendent," as " the favoured god of the Tamils."[7]

Sangam Literature mentions Murugu as a nature spirit worshipped with animal sacrifices and associated with a non-Brahmanical priest known as a Velan, a name later used to refer to the deity himself. The worship of Murugu often occurred in the woods or in an open field, with no particular associated structure. The rituals practiced included the Veriyaattu, a form of ritual-trance-dancing, which is still a common part of Murugan worship in Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Malaysia. Murugu was believed to hold power over the chaotic and could be appeased by sacrifices and Veriyaattu to bring order and prosperity.]
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This is not to say that Morrigan "mhor rheagan" great queen, and Murugan are linked, but the info. is interesting. More at Wikipedia Murugan, with the warrior riding a peacock with lady friends.

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Re: Morrigan

Postby Mannan » 11 May 2014, 13:49

She is often encountered at river-crossings or near water in the handful of medieval stories involving her. 'Mor' (Mar) implies a 'body of water' - the derivation of her name as Mor (Great) and -Rigan (Queen) would not be correct Gaelic: this would be Rigan Mor.

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Re: Morrigan

Postby Wolf Dreamer » 11 May 2014, 17:27

Here is a link to the OBOD site on the Morrigan. http://www.druidry.org/library/gods-goddesses/morrigan

There is also a book titled Celtic Lore and Spell Craft of the Dark Goddess by Stephanie Woodfield. I glanced through it but I wasn't studying the Morrigan at the time but it seemed to have some good information.

I hope that helps!

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