The Long Man

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envisager
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The Long Man

Postby envisager » 17 Aug 2012, 19:58

What meaning, if any, do Druids ascribe to the Long Man?

When looking at early methods of showing the nature of the world, I came across an unusual place nearby where everything seemed to be already set up to show the experiments I was going to try out: It's easiest explained on the forum topic below, but the essential starting requirement is two sticks (if you heard Simon Mayo Drivetime on Monday, that was me describing the method you can use to show that the world is curved by going to Beachy Head)

http://www.megalithic.co.uk/modules.php ... 82&forum=4

(I've deleted the location of this Neolithic mound from the thread above because someone accidentally let slip what else has been found there and I was a little worried that the mound might be a target for amateur excavators if it's position were known)

Thanks in advance!

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Re: The Long Man

Postby envisager » 25 Aug 2012, 08:15

Just an update

Since describing this experiment, we've found that all of the other English locations which are ideal for estimating the size or the world (part of a system of proving that the world is a sphere), also appear to have the same type of bowl tumulus in exactly the correct location. If it's of any interest, some of the best locations (each with a tumulus of the correct type, which happen to exist in each location) are as listed below:

Sussex station: http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=19759
Isle of Wight station: http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php ... 7058#27538
Dorset station: http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=19000

The theory/hypothesis behind this is that, when Caesar recorded that the Druids claimed to know the size of the world and of the heavens; they really did: This would have been a Geocentric world-view, not the Heliocentric one that we would recognise today (the link in the first post above has been expanded to show how it could be done)

Jon

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Re: The Long Man

Postby envisager » 28 Sep 2012, 18:30

Just an update:

Here's the Stonehenge component of all this (freely downloadable from the Megalithic Portal)

http://www.megalithic.co.uk/download.ph ... 1348762969

I'm moving onto the Long Man next

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Re: The Long Man

Postby andromeda » 28 Sep 2012, 21:03

I would be rather interested. The Long Man is one of my favourite locations. I try to go there as often as it is possible, I love the place and Alfriston too

Regretfully there are no trains there so I only go occassionally with a friend that has a car

I find the long man a very peaceful location. Nearby there is a little church with an amazing yew tree

Regretfully, as far as I have researched, there is no information about the origins of the Long Man. Some say it was the monks from a monastery but that does not make much sense to me.

Phillip Carr Gomm wrote a very inspirig book about his journey from Lewes to the Long Man, the book title is The Druid Way

:)
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Re: The Long Man

Postby envisager » 29 Sep 2012, 16:13

The Long man is a beautiful spot, but what's there is often missed:

At the base of the Long Man, there is an eliptical ring platform which has two levels and allows you to look out over the downs:
http://www.megalithic.co.uk/modules.php ... &pid=94535

behind the eliptical ring is a third platform

At the top of the Long Man are two barrows, one large , one small: The large one has a curious cut in its North Face:
http://www.megalithic.co.uk/modules.php ... &pid=94274

Below the main barrow is a large arena with a built-up path leading down, due north, into a large possibly natural arena: This arena is larger than Stonehenge's stone circle and has a main wide entry directly north of the tumulus at the top of the hill:
http://www.megalithic.co.uk/modules.php ... erby=dateD

To the east of the arena is a sub-arena and to the north of the entrance a 'speaker's platform capable of addressing both main arenas:
http://www.megalithic.co.uk/modules.php ... erby=dateD
http://www.megalithic.co.uk/modules.php ... erby=dateD

Out of the north entry is another level platform and three level stubs projecting out of the hill. A third small arena exists to the west. Below the three projecting earthen stubs are two further arena and a low level path:
http://www.megalithic.co.uk/modules.php ... erby=dateD

in the distance, there are several other arenas each cut in a similar fashion: All arranged with a north face which allows you to look directly to the North Star, where the heavens rotate, at night. These are generally thought of as being flint mines, but this seems a very odd activity given the vast quantities of flint available at the beach below Birling Gap.

And that's just the Long Man. Another brilliant place to visit is Combe Hill and, if you get the chance, Bourne Hill
In-between there are dozens of neolithic monuments, all of which seem to serve the same main purpose: If the Greek and Roman scholars are right about who did what, all these places would seem to be designed by the Vates (or otherwise known as Ovates/Eughages)

I'm in the process of writing it up but it's a huge explanation because there are just so many monuments. I kinda wondered if some locals already know what this is all for: The old names of the area seem to describe the purpose.

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Re: The Long Man

Postby envisager » 08 Nov 2012, 17:22

Just an update:

I've written the remaining sections as an e-book. The difference between this and the paper that's up in the Megalithic Portal is that the graphics have been improved and it also expands on other monuments (specifically in East Sussex) together with offering explanations for the Grail, the Four Treasures of.the Tuatha Dé Danann and how the Druids knew what Caesar records:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Stonehenge-Solv ... 00A25VWYG/

This is free to download on Sundays

The project started when doing some research into renewable energy. The project is a method of using a slowly rotating receptor to mimic the Sun's movement and collect energy from small flat plate fixed mirrors arranged as a circle (using principles similar to that of the Aceribo Observatory and the Auroville project).

By reflecting light instead of collecting, it can also be used to create a miniature version of the Sun's apparent movement around the world. It can create a model of the Universe if you like, but based on a geocentric (fixed world) model.

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Re: The Long Man

Postby envisager » 23 Nov 2012, 10:34

Last free day this Sunday (25) if any interest

Now no #1 in Amazon Paid science essays and commentaries:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/bestsellers/ ... c_1_5_last

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Re: The Long Man

Postby envisager » 10 Dec 2012, 11:30

Long Man and Stonehenge more or less complete:

Got a good review on the megalithic Portal: http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=2146414126

Overall I found this publication highly readable, being both informative and slightly controversial. A basic knowledge of the period would help the reader but most MegP devotees should have this. A basic knowledge of trigonometry would also help, but the book has enough illustrations (photographs, line drawings, diagrams and computer-aided pictures) to overcome the problem.

The author has obviously done a lot of research, but more importantly has put in a lot of leg-work visiting the sites mentioned in the book and has actually tried the experiments using only the materials available to megalithic peoples. When someone has done (or tried to do) something, you get an added depth to the experience and this certainly comes across in Jon’s writing. Page 11 has a marvellous example, when attempting to view the exact point on the horizon where the sun rises/sets. Even on a clear day this is often impossible due to the haze, something I also know through bitter experience.

The one thing that makes this book a winner is the fact that it’s central theory is not a house of cards. The various parts are not all required to prove that Stonehenge was a geocentric “planetarium” (or whatever the solar equivalent is) and equally you can accept all the parts but reject the final conclusion....

Highly recommended to anyone with an interest in Stonehenge.


Blatant plug. Sorry.

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Re: The Long Man

Postby Serenity » 10 Dec 2012, 21:43

Hi Envisager I have just found this thread and looking forward to reading your articles. I am in the middle of a reading blitz about megalithic sites and I am very pleased to have discovered your work.
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Re: The Long Man

Postby envisager » 11 Dec 2012, 20:05

Thanks Serenity

I hope you enjoy them

Jon


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