What evidence for Iron Age Druidry?

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Dysgwr
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Re: What evidence for Iron Age Druidry?

Postby Dysgwr » 11 Jan 2013, 11:32

What I would ask is: did they need to have a sign of their office? Communities being smaller, would not everyone really just know who the local druid was?
The same argument could be applied to Christian priests in rural parishes too. I'm sure they were easily distinguishable though through their vestments.
[condensed by Dysgwr]... genetic history work of Stephen Oppenheimer on the Origins of the British. ... Which is what Professor Barry Cunliffe suggests, that what are now called the 'Insular Celts', which provides the roots to Druidry, were formed from an Atlantic Celtic culture that had it's own sophisticated spiritual continuum.
I also subscribe to Oppenheimer and Cunliffe's theories in that the word Celtic could be better applied to a Culture that specific groupings of people.

So there's the evidence from Caesar, Strabo & Tacitus for early Druidry - Caesar says that the root of Druidry is in Britain. Earlier Greek writers and the archaeological history, included Stonehenge, suggest a religious centre in the British Isles.
Caesar's writing must be handled with care.. He was writing for a specific audience selling his invasion of Britain. A good seeling point was saying that britain was the crade of the barbaric religion which used human sacrifices to appease its Gods. It is not know that Caesar knew about Stonehenge or and Celts from that time which which he had contact knew about the megaliths. He could have been aware of the megaliths of Carnac and other places also. But from what I've studied scholars agree that it is probably just propaganda justifying a costly invasion and a means to further his glory
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Mannan
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Re: What evidence for Iron Age Druidry?

Postby Mannan » 11 May 2014, 13:25

Perhaps people place too much emphasis on what the Greeks and Romans said about the druids up until the end of the 1stC CE? The single most important and valid comments of Caesar, Lucan etc about the essence of the druid faith were those about the belief in metempsychosis. In fact, you'll probably intuit more by studying Celtic coins than reading Diodorus or Caesar...

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Sciethe
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Re: What evidence for Iron Age Druidry?

Postby Sciethe » 11 May 2014, 15:04

Ogam stone 19 (reference number to the Corpus Inscriptionum Insularum Celticarum - RAS Macalister, 1925 &49) is an Irish ogham stone in County Kildare which is unusual in that it has mixed Latin/Irish inscription (Latin is more a feature of British-located ogham inscriptions in former Irish colonies). I haven't seen this stone or the photographic plate for it but I'm sure it's on the "Fios Feasa" CD of ogam stones if anyone has it.

I think it's OVANOS AVI IVACATTOS - OVAN grandson of IVACATT.(Irish part of the ogam inscription) with accompanying latin is IVVE N/R E DRVVIDES (the N/R are two proposals for the letter there). The form of the inscription would point to a primitive Irish period (about 500AD) as apocape has not occurred (truncation of the word endings/ loss of terminal sounds due to linguistic changes circa mid 6th C onwards -the "archaic Irish" period).
Slightly later than Iron Age, just post-Roman, 500AD fits well with this find (in the OBOD library)
http://www.druidry.org/library/sacred-s ... borrowdale
which although tentative, is certainly food for thought. If Druidism was still being expressed in stone and tree-planting at that time then a great deal can be surmised about pre-Roman Druidic practice.
S
For in his morning orisons he loves the sun and the sun loves him. For he is of the tribe of Tiger. Christopher Smart

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Re: What evidence for Iron Age Druidry?

Postby Mannan » 13 May 2014, 21:45

Interesting paper! Did you notice that those stones appear to show the stars linking Taurus, Orion and right the way down Eridanus?

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Sciethe
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Re: What evidence for Iron Age Druidry?

Postby Sciethe » 15 May 2014, 20:47

Interesting paper! Did you notice that those stones appear to show the stars linking Taurus, Orion and right the way down Eridanus?
I hadn't noticed, no; there is so much more here than has been expressly written in the exploratory paper. The whole thing is crying out for more investigation! Glad you like it :)
S
For in his morning orisons he loves the sun and the sun loves him. For he is of the tribe of Tiger. Christopher Smart


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