Stonehenge: The Hidden Landscapes Project

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butterflymelody
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Stonehenge: The Hidden Landscapes Project

Postby butterflymelody » 22 Mar 2016, 21:18

Hello everyone!

I thought I would share a new research project I came across called The Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project. Using new technology, they are able to scan the landscape around Stonehenge and discover new sites without aimlessly digging. Their work is featured in the documentary "Stonehenge Empire" (http://www.smithsonianchannel.com/shows ... /0/3407073) but they also have some info on their site
(http://lbi-archpro.org/cs/stonehenge/index.html).

The important thing to take away is that Stonehenge was just part of many henges, graves, and other sacred sites in the area that were added over many centuries. If you get the opportunity to watch the documentary on TV, you also learn a lot about the people in pre-historic Britain which adds some cultural context to the sacred sites.

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Michael C. Page
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Re: Stonehenge: The Hidden Landscapes Project

Postby Michael C. Page » 23 Mar 2016, 12:33

Splendid Butterflymelody :D

A really good reference work to have on hand as you are following this is: The Stone Circles of the British isles, by Aubrey Burl, Yale University Press, 1976. An excellent survey, still not out of date and not a bit over priced. |-)

Cheers,
Michael
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"If a man does not keep pace with his companions,
perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.
Let him step to the music he hears,
however measured or far away."
- Thoreau

My harp was sacrificed to the Honorable Snarg.

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Green Raven
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Re: Stonehenge: The Hidden Landscapes Project

Postby Green Raven » 23 Mar 2016, 19:19

Thanks butterflymelody…

… and good recommendation, Michael! Still widely available in the UK as well and a constant companion when I’m exploring unfamiliar parts of the country.

May I also suggest Inside The Neolithic Mind, 2005, Lewis-Williams & Pearce. It’s a standard text for courses but not dry and high-brow at all - a real pleasure to read. It helps orientate the reader into the ancient world and the area that Mike Parker Pearson is the go-to authority on the up-to-date interpretation of. The whole vicinity is an allegory for understanding the spiritual journey between Neolithic ‘realms’ for the sparse early agricultural population of the time.

We are all waiting now for the inclusion of intelligent conjectures and context for the recent discovery of the Durrington Walls megaliths and their part in the Stonehenge story.
“Listen, O little pig! are not the buds of thorns
Very green, the mountain beautiful, and beautiful the earth?”
- Myrddin Wyllt, Hoianau / Greetings (to a Pig)

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illion
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Re: Stonehenge: The Hidden Landscapes Project

Postby illion » 24 Mar 2016, 05:47

May I also suggest Inside The Neolithic Mind, 2005, Lewis-Williams & Pearce.
I just love this place, for all the tips and inspiration :cloud9:

I just bought myself a new book :yay:

Thanks for the recommendation, Green Raven.

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butterflymelody
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Re: Stonehenge: The Hidden Landscapes Project

Postby butterflymelody » 24 Mar 2016, 16:37

Thank you Michael and Green Raven!

I don't know about anyone else in the US, but we did barely any ancient history at school, and even then we focused on ancient Greece and Rome. So it's been a challenge getting all of that history organized in my mind on my own. With so many groups involved in British history, it can be confusing to try to piece it all together! From what I've heard talking with people from the UK, a lot of the standard history education they get isn't even taught here. So it's great to get recommendations for things just to get a layout so to speak! :yay:

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Michael C. Page
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Re: Stonehenge: The Hidden Landscapes Project

Postby Michael C. Page » 24 Mar 2016, 19:29

Thank you Michael and Green Raven!

I don't know about anyone else in the US, but we did barely any ancient history at school, and even then we focused on ancient Greece and Rome. So it's been a challenge getting all of that history organized in my mind on my own. With so many groups involved in British history, it can be confusing to try to piece it all together! From what I've heard talking with people from the UK, a lot of the standard history education they get isn't even taught here. So it's great to get recommendations for things just to get a layout so to speak! :yay:
Oh you're welcome :) The good news is that the book I recommended I picked up three years ago at a Barnes and Nobel in Florence Kentucky. :-) Go figure eh. :) So you might still be able to pick it up rather easily.
Image

"If a man does not keep pace with his companions,
perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.
Let him step to the music he hears,
however measured or far away."
- Thoreau

My harp was sacrificed to the Honorable Snarg.


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