Welsh names for Festivals

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sunbird
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Welsh names for Festivals

Postby sunbird » 05 Feb 2007, 01:45

I'm racking my brains, and there aren't many to rack :(

ok, I've been looking all over the net trying to find what the Welsh would have called for instance Imbolc before those pesky romans came and destroyed it all.  So, I find for Beltane "Calan Mai", that's nice, but it isn't very pagan or celtic as it refers to the gregorian month and thus the ROMAN goddess.  Can anyone tell me the ANCIENT Welsh months and the ANCIENT Welsh festivals (even if they follow the Irish calendar or not, I just want to know (jumps up and down and has a tantrum

By the way, can someone feed this emote, it's really skinny!:icen:
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Postby ~*Blackbird*~ » 12 Mar 2007, 22:28

Hello, not sure how far back these terms go but I've always gone with:
Alban Arthan, Alban=Welsh for solstice/equinox-winter solstice,  
Gwyl Fair for Imbolc,
Alban Eilir (Eilir is an archaic Welsh word for butterfly and possibly also for spring) so Spring Equinox,
Calan Mai (calends of May) for Mayday/Beltane,
Alban Hefin,  Hefin=Welsh for aestival or "occurring in summer",
Gwyl Awst (Welsh for August holiday) for harvest festival/Lughnasadh,
Alban Elfed -Elfed is the archaic Welsh name for autumn so translates as autumn equinox and
Calan Gaeaf (calends of winter)for Halloween/Samhain.

Hope this helps!

Sam
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Postby Willowhawk » 13 Mar 2007, 06:52

Thank you! I've been wondering the same thing. :hug:

bendithion,

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Postby sunbird » 20 Mar 2007, 13:31

But May is a ROMAN thing, lol.  I wanted to know if anyone knew the Celtic words, I'm not happy working with the tounge of a people who stole our people and brought about the rift we now have to heal.
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Postby sunbird » 24 Apr 2007, 20:58

I thought about it, but Irish and Welsh are rarely the same, however, you just gave me an Idea, lol, I'll try contacting a cornish speaker! (sunbird has a lightbulb moment quickly followed by a D'OH!).

Thanks :hug:
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Postby Ben Wood » 25 Apr 2007, 16:20

I find it fascinating to come on this forum and hear a very different view from my own, on issues to do with the use of "Roman" words. As someone with Welsh ancestors and I suppose you could say, a fledgling Romano-Druid I'm some what caught in the middle on this one; I mean the question is, did those pesky Romans really destroyed it all? And although there were wounds inflicted by the Roman invasion, (not least the destruction of Mona and the defeat of Boudicca), does that make it automatically a negative thing to use Roman words? After all not all Britons were anti-Roman, especially in the south east of our land, many Britons were influenced by Roman culture, even before Julius Caesar arrived. In this sense, not all Roman interaction was brutal, and in many ways the contact with the Romans enriched and expanded Celtic culture rather than detracted from it. But of course we shouldn’t romanticize the pain and suffering the Romans caused and in no way do I dismiss your passionate feelings on this matter Sunbird. They are completely valid, but I just find it difficult as a Druid who works with Roman deities to see the legions and the eagle as purely forces of harm and division on this island. I think after all the battles, the Romans and their ways made their peace with this land and as Druids we should not be afraid to use what the Romans left behind them in times of peace. I realize this is a difficult discussion and I open in opening it up I haven’t upset anyone.
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Postby Ariadne » 25 Apr 2007, 19:57

Calan Mai is also known as Calan Haf, with 'Haf' meaning 'Summer'.

Hope that helps!

Heddwch!
Ariadne

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Postby tannos » 01 May 2007, 14:10

wow...ysee..this is what happens when I go about my magical life not think ing about what I'm doing!!!It hadnt dawned on me that Mai is the Maia thing I read about so much!!!Actually I'm really happy to have discovered this forum, I felt so alone in my wanting to use the welsh names for the festivals....as a welsh speaker I find that they are so much easier to pronounce, with the Irish ones ( I can speak a little Gaelic - and have Irish friends from various bits of Ireland) I felt like I was offending one of them by pronouncing it wrong...there never seemed to be a consensus....

So where did you all get this info from?????
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Postby tannos » 01 May 2007, 14:31

By the way.....I just found out from the online version of Geiriadur y Prifysgol (which I'm also over the moon to have discovered...it's sved me over 1000€ and translators never earn that much in Germany)- that Alban means Quater...and was thus used for the equinoxes....just thought I'd use my virgo moon and make sure every one knew that.....


@Blackbird, where did you get Gwyl Fair from????
Oh and "an der Runde" I just found that Lammas ( which is what I've called up until now...again because I never know if im saying Lughnassadh corectly and I dont want to cause offense) is acutally Gwyl Awst....which I think has already been said.....oopps

For Imbolc....otherwise known as Bigid's day or Bride's day if I'm not mistaken is Gwyl Sanffraid.
"[Barbara] Do you know who I really hate at the moment?
[Tom] Me?
[Barbara] No, more than you.
[Tom] Who?
[Barbara] That Mother Nature woman. She has a holiday all winter, comes back and bang, wallop goes raving mad!"(The good life series 3 episode 1)

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Postby astrocelt » 01 May 2007, 23:09

Alban means Quater...
Only since the late 1700's I'm affraid, nothing before that in cymraeg as far as I know. Apart from the latin definition of Alban.

Blessings
ac

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Postby tannos » 02 May 2007, 14:57

only since the late 17 hundreds...ooh how exciting..when did you find that out????(sorry that sounds really sad...Im just a language/linguistics freak!!!)
"[Barbara] Do you know who I really hate at the moment?
[Tom] Me?
[Barbara] No, more than you.
[Tom] Who?
[Barbara] That Mother Nature woman. She has a holiday all winter, comes back and bang, wallop goes raving mad!"(The good life series 3 episode 1)

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Postby astrocelt » 03 May 2007, 15:02

Hi Tannos

Its from Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru vol 1.

As for Calan Mai which has just passed this is listed to the 1200's. There is a large body of folk law from various region areas, mainly from the 1800's recorded by Trefor M Owen. Together with poetry which makes the occasion from the bards for an earlier period.

Blessings
Ac

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Postby tannos » 03 May 2007, 23:15

wow..cool...I looked at the GPC on the internet.....I don't know which version that is....anyway...I wanted a GPC I should have bought one at uni...I probably would have failed less supremely if id had one...that's what you get when listening to an ex with severe control issues!!!!!Ahhh well you live, you learn
"[Barbara] Do you know who I really hate at the moment?
[Tom] Me?
[Barbara] No, more than you.
[Tom] Who?
[Barbara] That Mother Nature woman. She has a holiday all winter, comes back and bang, wallop goes raving mad!"(The good life series 3 episode 1)

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Postby AndyN » 04 May 2007, 09:50

In Cornish we'd say "Kala' Me", "Cala Me" or "Calamaa" all pronounced the same but spelt differently depending on which version of Cornish you use.

"Kalann" is from the Latin "calendae" with cognates "calan" in Welsh and "kalan" in Breton. "Me" is from the Latin "Maius". THe opinions on the derivation of kalann and Me come from books by Leon Floriot via Ken George's Gerlyver Kernewk Kemmyn.

Andy N

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Re: Welsh names for Festivals

Postby sunbird » 06 Dec 2007, 16:41

There are a lot of misinterpretted words I find, Tammie being a Welsh speaker is forevere shouting out GWERSEEEEEEE when the Cds say Gwersoo and giggling when people say Alban Arthan for winter solstice when Alban means (according to Tam, White) and that Hefin comes fomr the Wlesh word for June not summer (summer is haf).
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Re: Welsh names for Festivals

Postby ennys » 07 Dec 2007, 08:34

Gwyl Fair...sounds like 'gouel Mari', feast of Mary. May is the month of Mary for the Catholics, but it is not so much of a pagan name...

The solar festivals of midwinter, midsummer and the equinoxes aren;t celtic btw, so you won;t find any original names for them. Only for the other four festivals, which are, indeed, celtic.
I can give you some breton names of festivals:
Imbolc: Gouel ar Gouloù (feast of the Light) or, more Christian, Itron Varia ar Gouloù (Our Lady of the Light = Candlemas)
Beltain: Kala-Hañv (first day of summer) or Kala-Mai
Lughnasadh: Hanter-Eost (half-harvest, Eost means Harvest but Miz Eost is the name of August too, so 'Harvest-month') There is also Gouel Varia Hanter eost (The festival of Our lady halfway august/harvest = Mary's ascension)
Samhain: Kala-Goañv (first day of winter), or Gouel an Anaon (Feast of the souls of the Dead - this is the Christian name), and on one internetsite I found 'heven' bus this seems to be a neologism.

Hope I help someone, though it is offtopic...
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Re: Welsh names for Festivals

Postby sunbird » 07 Dec 2007, 13:26

The Solstices actually did have significance to the Celts, many of their burial mounds and sanctuaries are aligned for the winter solsice sunrise to come through the door and reach the end of the passage, also, Julius Ceaser makes his references to the whole white robe and mistletoe about ethe winter solstice. The equinoxes however have been a cause for debate for a long time. I've been trying to celebrate them every year but they never seem to have the same feelings of "oomph" as the other ceremonies, and anyway, in the Celtic world, the middle of spring and the middel of autumn wouldn't have a ceremony, because they'd all be far too busy in the fields lol.

The Breton names look more like what I'm looking for, and seem to be very similar in language to the Welsh (Besides much of the time I use the Brythonic names for the deities which would be close too).

Thanks :)
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Re: Welsh names for Festivals

Postby ennys » 07 Dec 2007, 16:19

Yes, there you are right, about Caesar...maybe I spoke without enough nuance. But to what burial mounts and sacred places are you referring?
Great I helped you with the breton names :D

x
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Re: Welsh names for Festivals

Postby sunbird » 07 Dec 2007, 16:52

Newgrange is one of them, lol, I've really not been to many, but also, the lintels in the chamber at Newgrange (I think it's Newgrange, might be another one though lol) have zig zag marking son that are apparently the patters that the dust will make in the shaft of light that comes at sunrise when the correct resonance is reached in chant, or at least that's whay I read somewhere, I think it's more likely decoration, possibly representing water, as in the conduit to the spirit world.
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Re: Welsh names for Festivals

Postby ennys » 08 Dec 2007, 08:35

I hope you won;t hate me now, I have sun, ascendant, mars and venus in Virgo and I need to say this:
Newgrange, and other megalithic monuments, aren't celtic. They are built by pre-celtic, pre-indo-european peoples, who knew quite something about astronomy etc.
The eight feasts as we know them know are a compilation of the ancient Celtic feasts and, as far as I know, the Germanic solar feasts. Of course, midwinter and midsummer have had a great importance for other peoples all over the world.
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