Irish language learning advice.

Subforum for Irish language studies and posts.
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Donegal
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Irish language learning advice.

Postby Donegal » 09 May 2006, 00:02

Hi.

    I think it was Rob had asked a question about Irish language learning some time ago but unfortunately, his whole thread got erased during our database bug.  I thought I might as well give a beginner's advice on learning Irish.  I have been lerning Irish for almost a year now.  I am by no means good at it, also because I hardly have time to learn the language properly but I thought I might give you a few tips of book and other resources you may want to use if you decide to learn Irish.

                            DIALECTS.

    One of the basic problems of Irish is that it is a language that does not have a "standard', there is no "standard Irish", no "one Irish" people could learn.  the language changes a lot depending on which region of Ireland you are from and this can get confusing for beginners.  

    As far as I was concerned, I decided to learn Ulster Irish.  I must confess I chose almost at random, not having a clue, and because you need to take a decision at some point.  I then visited County Donegal, in Ulster and fell in love with it, hence my name, but originally, I chose to learn Ulster Irish almost by accident.  Most people don't want to learn Ulster Irish and prefer Conemara Irish, because this is the language you'll hear if you watch TG4, the Irish language chanel in Ireland, most of the Irish media are based in Connemara besides.  Ulster Irish sounds more like Scottish which is why even some Irish people make fun of it (Students from my Irish class make fun of me because I love Donegal.  If only they knew it was my name on these boards, there will be no end of laughing!).

                      IRISH LANGUAGE BOOKS AND DVDS.

    Still, Ulster Irish is lovely, and the North West of Ireland, which I love so much, is a real place of culture when it comres to the Irish language and music so people may still be interested in learning that particular dialect.  For those of you who may be interested in Ulster Irish, one of the best books on the market is "Now you're talking", by Deirbhile Ni Churraighin and Eamonn O donaill.  Unfortunately, the tapes that go with the book are out of stock in Ireland, but you can find the same book, either in the US or online from the US, with tapes, under the name "Irish on your own" (published by Passport books).  I work mostly with that book myself.  It's got an excellent reputation, and I personally find it stunning, easy to work with, it provides you with a lot of information and is an excellent starter on the language.

    As Irish Grammar can become daunting, I'd suggest another book you could work with contemporaneously, " Teach yourself Irish" by Duiarmuid O Se and Jospeh Shiels.  This book is the reference book Alswythmyth Uni uses on its Irish language Degree.  The Irish it would teach you is supposed to be standard Irish, the Irish they speak in Dublin.  The problem is, hardly anyone is a native Irish speaker in Dublin and there is no real Dublin Irish as such.  The Irish it teaches is fairly bookish and if you only work with it, you sometimes find yourself using words actual Irish speakers don't even KNOW themselves.  Yet, it provides consice, clear, excellent Grammar rules.  The Grammar isn't too much in it but it provides you with excellent foundations to start working on the language.  The book also contains a plethora of excellent exercises.  

                               
   Excellent books of more standard Irish like Connemara Irish are Buntus Cainte, which you can buyt online.  An excellent but more advanced Conemara Irish book is Turas Teanga.  They also made a Turas Teanga DVD which is an absolute stunner.  It is an Intermediatish level book and DVD but it still goes quite slowly, and makes sure it repeats a lot of the points made during lessons.  Lessons on the DVD are lively, there are drama scenes on each topic perfomed in Irish and subtitiled in English at the same time, which are then repeated without the subtitles, so you see how much you get of them the second time round.  Also, it is called "Turas Teanga" because it proposes a Tour of the language (whc=ich is what Turas Teanga means) so you get to visit every single region of Ireland in this DVD with its scenery, culture, music, poetry, but also its indutries and businesses.  I personnally LOVE it!

                                   DICTIONARIES.

    A good Irish English dictionary is the O'Donaill "Focloir Gaeilge-Bearla".  It simply is a classic.  The only problem is that is does not include some of the more modern Irish words, because it was compiled quite a olong time ago but it still is one of the best on the market.  "Now you're talking" also advises on buying the English Irish Dictionary Edited by De Bhaldraithe.  I bought mine on the Internet.  You would only need an English Irish dictionary, however, if like me you REFUSE to accept the fact you can hardly speak Irish at all and insist on sending random letter in Irish to Irish speaker you know  :wink: .  You really don't need to buy an English Irish dictionary at beginner level else, because you don't need to be writing in Irish a lot at first.  Still, if you want to buy one, I can recommend that one.

                                   IRISH SPEAKING RADIO.

     For those of you who may want to HEAR the language a lot to get to speak it faster, you can always plug yurself onto radio Na Gaeltachta, the Irishspeaking RTE Radio from the Gaeltacht.  Just go to RTE's website (http://www.rte.ie) and under "Radio" written in Blue, you have the names of four radios.  Radio 1, 2fm, lyric fm and Radio na Gaeltachta.  Just click on the little blue logo representing a speaker by the name Radio na Gaeltachta, you'll need Real Player or a similar program to listen to it.  Sometimes, the connection to the Radio is very bad and you can't listen to it properly.  But it works most of th time and is really great, all in Irish.  You can also pay about eight Euros a month if I remember well  (five pounds sixty, seven or eight US dollars) (I don't seem to be able to access their website just now to check) to watch a few hours of TG4's Irish language TV programpmes online.  Their web address is:  www.tg4.ie

                           INTERNET RESOURCES

    An excellent website you may also be interested in is the Daltai na Gaeile website (http://www.daltai.com).  It provides you with very basic Irish lessons, a shop where you can  buy Irish language books and Irish language related items and most importantly a bulletin board where people like me rant for hours about the Irish language ( :wink: ) and provide you with good advice on how to learn Irish at the same time.  One of the boards is bilingual and is for posts in both Irish and English, the other one is an Irish language only bulletin board.  There, you could get further information on good Irish langugae resources for people of all standards.  

                            IRISH LANGUAGE COURSES

    Also, I will never recommend it enough: go to Ireland and attend Irish language courses in the Gaeltachtai, the Irish speaking areas of Ireland.  An excellent one I know and often go to is Oideas Gael... in County Donegal (I love Donegal, in case you haven't noticed  :wink: ).  They propose Irish langugae courses but also various Irish cultures courses where you can learn Sean-Nos, Irish traditional singing, Donegal dances, pottery, harp, bodhran or where you can go hill walking.  Most courses take place in the wondrous village of Glencolumbcille fourty five minutes away by bus from Donegal town.  It's a bit of a journey to GET THERE in the first place, but it's well worth it.  It's an excellent course and it doesn't cost too much for what it is either! Their website address is: http://www.oideas-gael.com.

                GO N-EIRI AN BOTHAR LIBH (GOOD LUCK)! :D

    Well, here goes.  However you do it, if you start on the Irish language learning adventure, please don't feel discouraged: Irish can be hard to learn, and some Irish teachers, like the one I have in France for instance tend to only focus on the Grammar, which can put you down.  Whatever you do, don't feel discouraged: an Irish language course in the Gaeltacht or a good discussion with someone who speaks better than you can do more for you than long debates on verbs in the past tense.  Irish is a stunning language, but beware, when you start, it does tend to be addictive!... :wink: I think most people from my class in France would tell you that all right   :D .  If you have questions, if you want to broach on the subject, correct me on seomthing I just said please feel free to reply to this post, or pm me.  Although my Irish isn't very good, and I don't know much Irish myself, I'll do my best to help you.  Go n-éiri an bothar libh ("Good luck", in THE LANGUAGE  :) ).  Dun na nGall (who signs in Irish, "Dun na nGall" being the Irish form of "Donegal" when she writes on this particular forum :wink: ).  PS: STRIKES ME ThS COULD BE A STICKY, NOW I'VE WRITTEN IT AND IT SOUNDS INTERESTING BUT I DON'T KNOW, WHAT DO YOU THINK? IS IT WORTH KEEPING ON TOP OF THE SCREEN FOR USERS TO SEE?
Last edited by Donegal on 09 May 2006, 11:40, edited 2 times in total.

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Postby Art » 09 May 2006, 02:08

Sounds like sound advice to me! I've changed it to a sticky for that very reason. Thanks for jumping in!
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Postby Donegal » 09 May 2006, 11:30

I don't know about "sound advice", but this is the material I've worked with and enjoyed so far, anyway! Have a nice day.  Dun na nGall.   :)

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Irish Gaelic

Postby Mysteria » 09 May 2006, 11:48

Greetings;
              I have just started learning Irish Gaelic and I find it easier to use the phoentics in helping me to pronounce the words.  Nothing sounds like it looks.
               It will take be a bit as I do not have much opportunity to actually use it on an everyday basis.  My husband and I live in Florida and it sure does seem that Spanish is the native language here.


                                  Bright Blessings,
                         
                                     Mysteria

PS- What happened to my actual post numbers? They are not right since that crash happened.

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Postby Donegal » 09 May 2006, 12:17

Some people find using phonetics easier.  I personally find it misleading, as you may not have the same way of transcribing a word phonetically, or understanding a word's phonetics, if you are an English speaker and if you are a native speaker of another language (and although most Irish learners tend to be native English speakers, I still wouldn't take for granted all are, I know a lot of people who aren't native English speakers who are learning Irish).  I personally decided to do things the hard way and learn how to read the words right from the outset.  I even force myself to read articles written in Irish online so I can get it right without the use of phonetics.  This will help me not make too many spelling mistakes in my writing, but I must admit my expectations of what I will do with the language may be higher than most people's, as I would like to speak and write Irish like a native speaker in future years.  Phonetics helps me figure out how to pronounce verbs in the future tense, because these are really weird the way they are written and I like to be able to re-write them phonetically for myself too! The Diarmuid O Sé and Joseph Shiels' book proposes a few pages, at the beginning of the book, telling you what the "code" to pronounce Irish is, as in bh in Irish = v in English, mh in Irish=v or w, etc.  But there again, whatever works best for you.

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Postby ecne » 09 May 2006, 19:16

As this is a sticky, we may as well make it a comprehensive resource -Here are some of my favourite links:

Learning Irish

http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/ - Fantastic online community of Irish learners and advanced speakers who offer completely free human translations

http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/sc ... ize/irish/ - GCSE
Irish

http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/~oduibhin/sf/index.html - Short stories in Ulster Irish read aloud by a native

http://www.rte.ie/tv/turasteanga/ - Fantastic course - DVDs, CD's and Book

http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/ir ... ndex.shtml - Northen Ireland based website, with loads of good stuff for beginners, as well as regular radio programs as Gaeilge.

http://www.arts.ulster.ac.uk/lanlit//GA ... /index.htm - Fantastic interactive resource for the more advanced learner on the copula

http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm - Fantastically comprehensive grammar guide

http://www.englishirishdictionary.com/dictionary - Online Irish dictionary

http://www.teachnet.ie/projects.asp?url ... 04&pid=178

Resources

http://www.rte.ie/news/nuacht.html - watch the news in Irish

http://www.tg4.ie/ - Irish TV channel which even do online TV subscriptions

http://www.rte.ie/rnag/ - Irish language radio station

http://homepages.iol.ie/~rnl102/fuaim.html - ditto

http://www.gaeilge.ie/

http://www.nualeargais.ie/ - Excellent free downloadable program for llearning Irish

http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaeilge/gaeilge.html - Comprehensive guide to Irish on the Internet

http://www.beo.ie/ - Fantastic online Irish magazine

http://ga.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pr%C3%ADom ... leathanach - Wikipedia in Irish

http://www.gaelport.com/

http://www.coimisineir.ie/index.php?pag ... ng=gaeilge

http://www.acmhainn.ie/

http://www.fiosfeasa.com/gaeilge/index.html

http://www.aimsigh.com/ - Irish language search engine (not amazing though)

http://www.fainne.org/ - Webring of Irish sites

Language Courses

http://www.oideas-gael.com/

http://www.crannog.ie/ - Donegal based language school

http://www.dailuladh.com/ - ditto

http://www.daltai.com/home.htm - American courses. Excellent site with forum and lessons

Irish language venues

http://www.caifeuna.com/

http://www.gaelscoileanna.ie/ - Schools taught through the medium of Irish

http://www.corca-dhuibhne.com/

http://www.clubsult.com/ - Irish language night club

Publications

http://www.foinse.ie/

http://www.nuacht.com/

Shops

http://www.litriocht.com/shop/

Computer stuff

http://www.microsoft.com/ireland/gaeilge/ - Windows XP in Irish

http://www.kde.ie/ga.php

http://borel.slu.edu/gnu/

http://www.mozilla.com/firefox/all - Mozilla Firefox in Irish

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Postby Donegal » 09 May 2006, 21:16

Wow, beautiful, thanks Ecne!!!!!  :D  :D  :D

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Postby Seeker » 09 May 2006, 22:17

Great stuff, Ecne! Thanks for sharing... :shake:
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Postby madpoet » 08 Jul 2006, 21:21

There is an application I use (OS X) called "Before You Know it", it opperates like a flash card system - it's been helping me with my spelling.  There is a free version, that has plenty of phrases and words in it, plus a Deluxe version that has a ton of info in it, both versions can be added to, creating your own lessons.  It is in Connemara Irish and can be found at http://www.byki.com/fls/iris/irish
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Truth in our hearts.
Strength in our hands.
Consistency in our tongues.

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Postby Donegal » 09 Jul 2006, 22:58

Go rabh maith agat mhadpoet! I downloaded "before you know it" and did some work on it.  I had such craic working on it!  :D

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Postby Zilandra » 09 Dec 2006, 00:48

I've started learning Irish Gaelic through the BBC's blas course. Not an easy thing since like someone already said before, you pronounce nothing like it is written. It's very fascinating though. It sounds so great... Too bad there is no one i know that has an intrest in learning it around here (home)...

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Postby Donegal » 10 Dec 2006, 23:20

Dia daoibh a gcairde!

    Sorry, I haven't been around much since I started college in September, I've been ridiculously busy! Zilandra, are you from Flanders? some Antwerp people I met on an Oideas Gael Irish language course in Ireland have just started a study group for Flanders people.  Here is their web address: http://users.skynet.be/Prodesse/vrienden/.  Website in Irish, Flemmish and English but if you are from French speaking Belgium, I still think you should get in touch with their group.  They are very nice people, very dedicated to the Irish language (and not in the least anti wallon like a lot of people in Belgium - or so I'm told, at least -!) and I know one of them travels to Brussels quite a lot.  They might be able to help you with organising trips to Ireland or finding an Irish class somewhere in Belgium.  

   I was also planning on organising Irish language classes for people from the continent (Belgium, Netherlands, Luxemburg, France, Switzerland and Italy, primarily) in the future, with a friend from Ireland who lives in Geneva.  If that would be of any interest to you, you could PM me an email address so I'll get in touch should we organise something that might be of any interest to you in the future.  Le meas.  Donegal.  :.).

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Postby Zilandra » 11 Dec 2006, 15:51

Dia daoibh a gcairde!

    Sorry, I haven't been around much since I started college in September, I've been ridiculously busy! Zilandra, are you from Flanders? some Antwerp people I met on an Oideas Gael Irish language course in Ireland have just started a study group for Flanders people.  Here is their web address: http://users.skynet.be/Prodesse/vrienden/.  Website in Irish, Flemmish and English but if you are from French speaking Belgium, I still think you should get in touch with their group.  They are very nice people, very dedicated to the Irish language (and not in the least anti wallon like a lot of people in Belgium - or so I'm told, at least -!) and I know one of them travels to Brussels quite a lot.  They might be able to help you with organising trips to Ireland or finding an Irish class somewhere in Belgium.  


   I was also planning on organising Irish language classes for people from the continent (Belgium, Netherlands, Luxemburg, France, Switzerland and Italy, primarily) in the future, with a friend from Ireland who lives in Geneva.  If that would be of any interest to you, you could PM me an email address so I'll get in touch should we organise something that might be of any interest to you in the future.  Le meas.  Donegal.  :.).
Hey Donegal!

Thank you for your answer!
Yes, i am from flanders and i speak flemish, i live about half an hour from Antwerp. Thank you so much for the link, i will definitely check this out later tonight!
I wish i could take a trip to Ireland but i am kinda chained to the house since i have a few kids to raise on my own but somewhere in the future  first chance i get i'll be on a plane to Eire and it would be great to do it with kindred spirits...

I will PM you tonight about the Irish classes, thanx!!

Slan !

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Re: Irish language learning advice.

Postby Beith » 29 Jan 2008, 14:03

Hi

This is a link to the language page of Island Ireland ( a collection of weblinks to various archaeology, folk culture, language, history sites)

Teaching groups and learning resources therein.

http://islandireland.com/Pages/irish.html

slán is beannacht!
Beith

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Re: Irish language learning advice.

Postby Saibhir-Go-Leor » 28 Aug 2008, 05:01

HELP WITH UNDERSTANDING PRONUNCIATION:

Dè an t-ainm a th’ ort?

What is your name?


Pronounced as:

"Jay en ten-Yem ah HorSHt"

Where does the "SH" sound come in versus what the spelling is?

:shrug:

You may hear this at:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/alba/fogh ... n02_15.ram
:-|
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(Thank you!)

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Re: Irish language learning advice.

Postby Beith » 01 Sep 2008, 20:27

Hi Saibhir go Leor,

You might be better posting that in the Gáidhlig (Scots Gaelic) forum rather than here (Irish gaelic) as it seems to me to be Scots G rather than Irish Gaeilge (unless in Ulster dialect there is similar construction).

We would say "cén t-ainm a tá ort?" - literally "what name is upon you?"

pron. "Kane tan-im a taw urt"

or "Cad is ainm duit" (lit, what/which is the name to you?)

pron. "kad iss an-im duitch"

I can't hear the sound files on the link you set up but I imagine any 'sh' sound (where none is apparent in a th' ort" is simply the manner of speech of the speaker. Ort is "ort" without any "sh" sound at all, although some speakers both here and in Scotland give a very soft 't' sound (pronouncing 'final t' like the tch sound in the English word "itch". Perhaps that answers your question? if not, go on a SG forum and ask about it or post in the SG forum here and maybe some learners/speakers there can help.

le dea ghuí,
Beith

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Re: Irish language learning advice.

Postby Saibhir-Go-Leor » 09 Sep 2008, 06:42

Beith,
Thank you kindly for your response.
I realized after I had made mine, that I was, indeed, listening to the pronunciation of the Scottish Gaelic.
Nonetheless, I have noticed that the Irish Gaelic has perhaps an equal number of anomalies -- or "surprises" for me -- in the variety of pronunciations.
It's very exciting to bear this initial "witness" to these variations and intimidating for a novice like me.

Thank you!
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TIME MAGAZINE - Ireland's Language Dilemma

Postby Saibhir-Go-Leor » 24 Oct 2008, 20:58

Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008
Ireland's Language Dilemma
By Don Duncan

Find this article at:
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/ ... 28,00.html

After decades of exodus, the tide of Irish migration took a definitive turn in the late 1980s, when the Irish diaspora started to come home. Maebh Walsh was one of those who returned. The 49-year-old designer decided to move back to Dublin after years living in Arizona. Walsh says living abroad for so long caused her family to return "more aware of our background and our 'Irishness.' So when we came back in 1988 and had children, we wanted them to have our culture."

And so Walsh, like more and more Irish parents, sends her children to a school where all the lessons are taught in Irish — Ireland's indigenous Celtic language. Over the past decade, gaelscoileanna, as the schools are called, have become one of the fastest-growing sectors in Irish education. And though they still only comprise 5% of Ireland's schools, their number has tripled since the early 1990s.

The explosion in gaelscoileanna is part of an Irish-language renaissance that's been building over the past twenty years. Centuries of colonization left Ireland with a severely depleted population of Irish speakers by the time it gained independence from Britain in 1922. For decades after, the language was ghettoized in remote, rural pockets of the country and weighed down by associations with poverty or sectarian extremism. Today, between 5 and 10% of the 4.2 million people living in Ireland speak Irish on a daily basis, and many of those are students who only speak it in school. Máire Nic Ghiolla Phádraig, senior lecturer of sociology at University College Dublin, witnessed the impact of the rise in gaelscoileanna on her university campus with more and more gaelgóirs, or Irish speakers, arriving each year. "I have seen the change during Fresher's week," Nic Ghiolla Phádraig says. "Hundreds of Irish speakers join the Cumann Gaeleach [Irish club] and wearing "Grá don Gaeilge" ["I Heart Irish"] stickers. It's no longer regarded as 'uncool' to speak Irish."

But the rise of the old tongue has some worried about a potentially new conflict: that the increasing number of gaelscoileanna will pit Ireland's constitutional vow to preserve its "native" language against the obligation as a modern country to integrate its increasing immigrant population. While Walsh and hundreds of thousands of other Irish were making their way home, other, newer migration paths were being cut from China, Nigeria, Poland and many other countries. Between the late 1980s and today, the percentage of foreign-born residents in Ireland grew from around 1% to almost 12%. "People choose gaelscoileanna for all kinds of reasons, but realistically it would rarely be the first choice for newly arrived immigrants," says Colette Kavanagh, a principal at Esker Educate Together School in Lucan, a commuter town outside of Dublin.

That disconnect, says Kavanagh, could engender a defacto segregation in the Irish school system — and a potentially unfair distribution of more resources to Irish schools. "These schools could unintentionally lead to a kind of white flight from English-language education," she says. At Kavanagh's English-speaking school, one of the most diverse in the country, 95% of the students are children of immigrants. At the nearest Irish-language school, only 5% of the student body is foreign-born.

Sociologists say Ireland's linguistic renaissance and the nation’s spike in immigration are both triggered in part by the 'Celtic Tiger' — the growth phenomenon that has seen the Irish economy mushroom by over 150% since 1995. Years of EU infrastructural and educational support and a young and cheap labor force made Ireland a fertile ground for foreign investment in the domestic IT sector, among other industries, and the result has seen the average annual family income double to $93,000 in the past 10 years. Nic Ghiolla Phádraig says this new prosperity brought a sense of pride and self-assurance that prompted a rediscovery in Ireland's "cultural assets" — Irish being one of them.

In places like Ennis, a town in southwest Ireland, immigrants are beginning to claim those assets for themselves. Like Lucan, the town’s population has also radically diversified over the past decade. Schools have shifted gears accordingly, setting aside a minimum of 5% of places to foreign-born students. The town's Irish language school, Gaelscoil Mhíchíl Cíosóg, surpassed the figure this year, with 10% of its admissions made up of children of immigrant parents — Nigerian, Polish, Dutch, Ghanaian and Spanish among them. Initially, says principal Dónal O hAiniféin, the school was not an obvious choice for immigrants, but as their communities put down roots, "They tell me, 'My child is Irish, I'd like him or her to be fluent in the Irish language.'" Schools around Ennis are now discussing raising the required minority admission rate to 25% in 2009.

As targets like these continue to be pursued nationwide, it may, in fact, be the new Ireland that helps this old language grow. Michal Boleslav Mechura, a 33-year-old resident of Dublin who immigrated from the Czech Republic ten years ago, became fluent in Irish and finds it useful in his own integration process. "People don't realize I'm not from here when I speak in Irish," Mechura says. "A lot of Irish people who speak Irish speak it as a second language and so we are all on the same footing. I fit in better in Irish."
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Re: Irish language learning advice.

Postby moonfrog » 22 Jun 2010, 06:20

I’ve being messing about with the idea of learning Irish for a long time, apart from a few half hearted attempts, I’ve done very little to this end, but reading some of your comments here, has rekindled the desire, so thanks very much, or (gura- mena- mora- gut ) as my memories version goes, or “go raibh míle maith agat “ as the Irish/English translation dictionary puts it.

The little I recall of my school Irish is a few fragmented sounds, so I will find the time to recover my language, and at least be able to utter my last few words, as I heard my Gran Da, in his last few days

And I’ve been turning the house upside down looking for my Hiberno English dictionary, because this is also a valued part of my Irish culture.
A couple of items I found, I hope will be of interest.



The Gerry Tobin Irish Language School is a free, volunteer based, non-denominational school committed to furthering Irish as a living language. The school welcomes anyone with an interest in developing or improving their knowledge of Irish.

http://www.scoilgaeilge.org/

A Dictionary of Hiberno-English
I won’t give the Amazon link, in case it breaks house rules on advertising, but Google it if you are interested.

Hiberno-English info link
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiberno-English




Anyone living in London wanting to learn Irish can start with basics, may even give it a shot myself

try this site, and I think the college of NW London do an Irish class
http://www.irishculturalcentre.co.uk/?q=adult/language


Good Luck

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MossyMermaid
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Re: Irish language learning advice.

Postby MossyMermaid » 06 Feb 2012, 20:58

Thank you for all the links and info. I finally decided to take the plunge and do a beginners course in London.

If you're looking for a place to start, the London Irish centre runs courses for beginners, intermediates and Advanced....

http://www.londonirishcentre.org/index. ... l/gaeilge/


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