Incredible

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Larien
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Incredible

Postby Larien » 02 May 2009, 23:16

I just experience the most amazing thing.

I was listening to the CD for Approaching the Forest part 1 when it asked the first question to think about and jot down in the journal.

I sat there and let my mind go blank and all of a sudden very coherent sentences started popping out of my head. If I tried to slow it down or change something, it would repeat the word it wanted me to write until I did, then it moved on. Very strange!

At the end it quoted something in gaelic that I cannot understand as I don't speak gaelic.

Here it is, rather phonetically unfortunately:

Fion loch be non tuath for.

Any ideas? I feel that my soul is in touch with a past life I cannot quite understand. Definately on the right path, I can tell!!
Amy
LOR Elf name: Larien Nenharma

The Druid's Mystical Homestead
https://oregondruid.wordpress.com/

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Larien
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Re: Incredible

Postby Larien » 02 May 2009, 23:35

I did some looking up on the Irish Dictionary and it seems like a word jumble haha.

Something about a lake in the country, evolution/development, crossing-over or across, and Beidh??
Amy
LOR Elf name: Larien Nenharma

The Druid's Mystical Homestead
https://oregondruid.wordpress.com/

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ennys
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Re: Incredible

Postby ennys » 04 May 2009, 16:50

My Irish is worthless, and as this is fonetic I can even make less of it.

the words I see in it:

Fion loch be non tuath for.
wild. lake. to be. non?. tribe. on (it)

wild lake without a tribe on it?
As I told you, I don't speak Irish..but maybe this will encourage the scholars to correct me :P
Dancing to the music of the Web
Etre ar mor hag an neñv hag an douar

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Beith
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Re: Incredible

Postby Beith » 04 May 2009, 20:08

Here it is, rather phonetically unfortunately:

Fion loch be non tuath for.
Hi,

It looks like various random words and what they mean depends on era of language and that these are approximates phonetic spellings which may or may not match a real word.

eg. Fion could be Fíon meaning "wine" or fionn meaning "pale" "bright" "white" or fionn meaning "find, ascertain" or fionn meaning "cataract" - you don't say whether it was pronounced "fee-yon" or "feen" or "finn"...in which case one could make a better guess at the underlying word.

loch - meaning lake or inlet or depending on sense, a hole or pit. Also in Old Irish loch can imply something dark or black or lóch -something bright, and also something a variant spelling of lóg meaning a price, value, or worth, or a variant of lóg- a flame.

be - you don't say how this is pronounced. Whether be sounds like "beh" or "bee" or "bay". Possible forms could be:

Old Irish bé "bay" - woman
BÍ "bee" - the continuous present "to be" - Bí
Beith - "beh" (modern pronunciation) or "beth" (Old Irish pronun) = birch tree
Beidh - the future tense of bí "will be" as in "beidh mé ag dul go dtí na siopaí amárach "I will be going to the shops tomorrow"

non - a possibility would be Old Irish class A 1st plural infixed pronoun "n" (us, we) fixed to the meaningless particle "no" to given "non" but this only works where you have a verb to which the pronoun is attached and in the above selection of words, you don't. eg. non-cara "he loves us"

or it could be related to the article "an" (plural "na") in Modern Irish - or Old Irish: In/Ind/a in singular or in (dual) or Inna (plural), which can have various mutational effects on the beginning of the word that follows the article - for example, nasalizing it or leniting it. Where vowels get nasalized an n- is prefixed to them eg. Tír na nÓg (the n of nÓg is an initial mutation - a nasalization following the article).

túath - literally a small kingdom but also used semantically as a people or tribe eg. Túatha Dé Dannan - the People of the Gods of Danu

for - is Old Irish it's a preposition meaning "over" or "on" or a prefix or pre-verbal particle eg. for-cain "to teach or instruct" (literally "to over-sing" as the base verb is canaid, to sing); but of course this is just the spelling you have given as a phonetic which could reflect any word like fóir - a boundary, fóir - to relieve,
fair - to watch, expect, look out for something
fáir - a nest
etc.

So really, it's hard to make sense out of a word jumble especially when using written phonetic spellings which may or may not reflect the words you heard.

Maybe the above is of some use, but perhaps if you have more detail on context that might help? eg. you say you were doing "Approaching the Forest part 1 when it asked the first question to think about and jot down "

I'm not sure what "approaching the forest" is (a meditation exercise?) or what the "first question" to think about was. So if you give those contextual details and maybe a little more clarification on the phonetics of the words as above, that may help to further elucidate possible meanings. In Irish the presence of a length mark (a "fada") on a vowel makes a huge difference to the pronunciation of the word and its meaning eg. sean = "shan" and means "old" but seán is a boy's name "jack, John" and sén "shane" is an omen or sign.

best wishes
Beith

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Larien
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Re: Incredible

Postby Larien » 08 May 2009, 15:00

Maybe if I spell it more phonetically it will help!

Feeon lok bee non tuath fore

I appreciate all your help!
Amy
LOR Elf name: Larien Nenharma

The Druid's Mystical Homestead
https://oregondruid.wordpress.com/

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Larien
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Re: Incredible

Postby Larien » 08 May 2009, 15:04

Approaching the Forest is the introductory 2 gwersi for the Bardic grade. Without going into detail, the first gwers asked a question and you had to write, without consciously thinking about it, your thoughts on the question. The gaelic sounding word jumble had to do with Druidry in some way. When I get a tutor, I'll run it past them in more detail as well.
Amy
LOR Elf name: Larien Nenharma

The Druid's Mystical Homestead
https://oregondruid.wordpress.com/

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Beith
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Re: Incredible

Postby Beith » 16 May 2009, 21:22

Hi Larien

Can't give you any more help than the above. The word selection looks to be random - ie. not a sentence but individual words -maybe ideas related to your visualisation or whatever brought them about.
The equivalent words to your phonetics are: Fionn, Loch, Bí, no-n túath, for - meanings given in my post above. Maybe those meanings resonate with your meditation images.

best wishes with it!
Beith


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