Quandry on Translation

Subforum for Irish language studies and posts.
User avatar
SonicRed
Posts: 16
Joined: 05 Apr 2012, 21:58
Gender: Female
Contact:

Quandry on Translation

Postby SonicRed » 21 Aug 2012, 03:43

Hello All,

I am in need of minor assistance if it could be had.
For the following: "I had forgotten", as in "I had forgotten a thing but now I recall it and I am seeking to never do so again", which of the following would best fit said connotation: Raibh dearmad déanta agam, or Bhi me dearmad, or am I very far off and neither? I thank in advance any and all for their wisdom and assistance.

Blessings
The Beauty of Life is its Imperfections

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2144
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Quandry on Translation

Postby treegod » 22 Aug 2012, 15:16

I don't know the answer, but I've asked this on a forum which interest in languages and linguistics. I'll forward any answer there is.

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2144
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Quandry on Translation

Postby treegod » 22 Aug 2012, 17:59

There is no direct translation of "I had..." in Irish (no pluperfect). But there are a few options.

A simple "I forgot" can be "rinne mé dearmad or do dheinis dearúd.

Or you could use the imperfect ("I was...") déanainn dearmad.

Hope that helps somewhat.

Is there anyone else that speaks/knows Irish that could comment?

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2144
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Quandry on Translation

Postby treegod » 24 Aug 2012, 10:43

Yeah, that looks like Google Translate all right. You won't be surprised to discover that neither of these phrases is remotely grammatical.

The issue is that Irish altogether lacks a pluperfect. Even speakers of Irish English avoid it. There are a couple of constructions in Irish called the "perfect", but their use is limited to events completed in the present. So you can say "Táim t'réis déanamh dearmaid ar a ainm" to mean "I've just forgotten his name" but it doesn't make much sense to put this into the past tense without the right narrative context.

So you would simply say "I forgot" (rinne mé dearmad--or, the way I speak Irish, do dheinis dearúd) and rely on context to disambiguate whether you've since remembered again or not. Another possibility is to use the imperfect, i.e. déanainn dearmad. This makes it clear that your days of forgetting are over, but it implies that forgetting was something habitual, i.e. you would forget it, remember, and then forget again.
Here's the full answer I got on the other board. My own answer had been lacking necessary detail.

And another paragraph, added later.
SonicRed might also find it useful to know that rinne mé dearmad is Standard Irish whereas do dheinis dearúd is Munster dialect (specifically West Muskerry).

User avatar
SonicRed
Posts: 16
Joined: 05 Apr 2012, 21:58
Gender: Female
Contact:

Re: Quandry on Translation

Postby SonicRed » 27 Aug 2012, 01:53

Thank you so very much for your assistance. I know the quote is not quite grammatically correct and therefore presents some difficulty, but your assistance was most helpful.

Blessings
The Beauty of Life is its Imperfections

User avatar
treegod
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2144
Joined: 26 Apr 2007, 16:28
Gender: Male
Location: Catalonia, Spain
Contact:

Re: Quandry on Translation

Postby treegod » 27 Aug 2012, 08:41

Your welcome. :)

What was it for, if you don't mind me asking?

User avatar
SonicRed
Posts: 16
Joined: 05 Apr 2012, 21:58
Gender: Female
Contact:

Re: Quandry on Translation

Postby SonicRed » 28 Aug 2012, 22:51

It's actually an old family motto and as such I was hoping to incorporate that aspect of my heritage with the Gaelic aspect of it. Abstract sayings like this one tend to pose complications however and I'm not sure I can do it justice. I was thinking of skipping the Gaelic and going straight to Ogham, but that seemed to me an even worse idea for multiple reasons.
The Beauty of Life is its Imperfections

brynamgale

Re: Quandry on Translation

Postby brynamgale » 29 Jan 2016, 19:25

Hello, I was wondering if I could have something translated to Irish as well. This is for something for my dad, who grew up in Ireland, but has lived in the US most of his life. I want to do "forever my home" or something like that. from a few auto-translation sites, I have found two possible translations (which are most likely not correct gramatically):

go deo mo bhaile (also, I have seen bhaile with an without the 'h'); or

go bragh mo bhaile

Let me know what you think!

User avatar
Heddwen
OBOD Druid
Posts: 3125
Joined: 26 Sep 2007, 16:06
Gender: Female
Location: West Wales
Contact:

Re: Quandry on Translation

Postby Heddwen » 29 Jan 2016, 21:51

Hello, I was wondering if I could have something translated to Irish as well. This is for something for my dad, who grew up in Ireland, but has lived in the US most of his life. I want to do "forever my home" or something like that. from a few auto-translation sites, I have found two possible translations (which are most likely not correct gramatically):

go deo mo bhaile (also, I have seen bhaile with an without the 'h'); or

go bragh mo bhaile

Let me know what you think!

Hello there, brynamgale and welcome to the OBOD board! Good luck with the translation!

User avatar
kresta
OBOD Bard
Posts: 68
Joined: 22 Mar 2013, 02:42
Gender: Female
Location: Cardiff
Contact:

Re: Quandry on Translation

Postby kresta » 30 Jan 2016, 15:42

I think your translations are correct - just remember the accents :) go brách

I'll leave this to the more experts, but the position of words might give different shades of meaning to the expression, so you might wanna look into that; I've always seen go brách after the nouns (ex. Eire go brách) so not sure whether it might be 'more Irish' to put it after mo bhaile or whether it doesn't really matter..
Through the darkness of future past, the magician longs to see,
one chants out between two worlds - "Fire, walk with me".

User avatar
Armitage
OBOD Bard
Posts: 161
Joined: 20 Oct 2015, 10:37
Gender: Female
Location: SW Ireland
Contact:

Re: Quandry on Translation

Postby Armitage » 30 Jan 2016, 17:54

Brynamgale, you may wish to check out these two Irish sites:

http://talkirish.com/forums/
http://www.daltai.com/forums/viewforum/2/

They each have a number of threads where native Irish speakers translate English phrases, house names, etc. into proper Irish; one of their members could help get the exact grammar.

Good luck!


Return to “Irish”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests