How to pronounce please

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SeashoreDruid

How to pronounce please

Postby SeashoreDruid » 15 Nov 2012, 13:50

For starters I am hoping that "An Lucht Lonrach" means the shining ones - or I will have a headache - LOL.

What I am looking for please is someone to tell me how it pronounced. It's part of my business name up to now I just get away with writing it down.
I am learning Irish - just bought Teach Yourself Irish. But this could take a wee bit of time. LOL.

Thanks for taking time to read this.

Hopefully someone will be able to get back to me on this..

Cheers

Linda

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treegod
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Re: How to pronounce please

Postby treegod » 15 Nov 2012, 23:31

I think Irish pronunciation can vary, depending on dialect. If I was on the right computer I'd record this, but at the moment I can't, so I'll try going through this Wiki article and try to decipher something from it.

an: could be pronounced how you might say it, though with a more "open" <a> (think with Irish accent, perhaps).

<l> as usual, and <u> as in book (short oo), <ch> as in Spanish <j> or Scottish loch, and <t> as usual.

<o> before <n> is pronounced the same as <u> above (there's a range of possibilities in other positions), <r> as a "tapped" r, as in Spanish or some Scottish dialects (not rolled), and <d> as usual.

So something like: "an lucht lunrad"

Hope it helps. :duck: :wink:

edit: I don't speak it, and don't know how to pronounce it (apart from a few technical clues), but there should be someone here that can confirm. :)

SeashoreDruid

Re: How to pronounce please

Postby SeashoreDruid » 24 Feb 2014, 01:36

Many thanks for this. Very much appreciated.

Haven't been on the board for a while so sorry for the delay in responding :)

Linda

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elementalheart
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Re: How to pronounce please

Postby elementalheart » 24 Feb 2014, 10:37

No idea in Irish but since you're apparently setting up a group in Scotland I wonder why not Scots Gaelic?

The nearest equivalent for folk/people in SG would be Luchd (pr. loochc) and what I think you are using for shining would equate to lonnrach (lonn is pr. loon and ch as in loch not lock obviously :wink: ) But lonnrach would be either wild or glittering, lonn being wild angry fierce or strong and powerful depending on your interpretation. It's equivalent in Irish is given as lond tho, so I may be mistranslating the Irish back the way.. There is also loinnear, meaning bright or elegant which can be used as glittering or shining or bright, but the Irish version of that I find as lainderda.

Not really sure what you are aiming for but hope that helps. I'm not a native Gaelic speaker incidentally, just a couple years of classes to go on but if you're over the west coast I'm sure you'd find plenty Hebridean born folk in Glasgow area with local variations. Central belt it's not so strong a tradition to have a locally correct variant.
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SeashoreDruid

Re: How to pronounce please

Postby SeashoreDruid » 24 Feb 2014, 11:44

Many thanks again :)

Though I live in Scotland - Troon - and have English parentage I am actually Irish - and trying to learn (slow process LOL) my native language.

If I could get up to Glasgow regularly it would be easier to learn Irish as they have a group up there. But it is the cost - so I am learning by tapes and by letters from my American penpal who is living in Spain teaching English :)

A while back I telephoned a department in Dublin and the lady who admits she was not a fluent speaker gave me a wee bit of help to pronounce it so that I could say it to the BBC reporter.

Now that I have been advertising An Lucht Lonrach for so long I might as well just go with it with fingers crossed LOL :)

Many thanks again - very much appreciated.

Linda


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