Vegetarianism

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EmilyRaven
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby EmilyRaven » 15 Sep 2012, 06:49

I happen to be a vegetarian, vegan actually, and have abstained from meat and animal products most of my life. I wouldn't call it a requirement for any spirituality but I certainly feel that is related to my concepts of nature-based faith and Druidry. Just because the ancients did something doesn't mean we should follow suit. Eating meat was more practical in the past for some populations, but if you do research you'll find that actually milk and cheese was a far more common staple to the ancients. Even the Vikings saw the practice of slaughtering animals for food as wasteful and had a diet rich in cheese supplemented with caught game and fish, but cheese was the main source of their protein.

When I meet people I usually don't tell them I'm a vegan. I also have Celiac Disease, so I can't eat wheat. So I can simply pass on many foods without making it a big issue. If asked I will talk about it though because being vegan makes me feel happy. It's amazing to me that plants produce fruits (we call some of them vegetables) that have seeds in them that are to be eaten to help their seeds spread. I think that's a unique relationship that we animals have as crucial to plant's survival thanks to the food they give us.

Anyhow. If anyone is interested there is a lot of research showing that we are not true omnivores and our bodies do much better health-wise on a plant-based diet. http://michaelbluejay.com/veg/natural.html

If nothing else meatless mondays are popular here in the states and a good way to add some variety to your diet without going full on vegetarian.

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Ravenari
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Ravenari » 16 Sep 2012, 10:02

I am an omnivore, though I love fruits and vegetables and will happily cook vegetarian (as I will be this evening).

I have been told by a haematologist that I must consume red meat on a regular basis (more often than I used to) because my body struggles - due to a genetic deformity - to accept oral iron; and all plant-based iron is simply discarded/excreted by the body. Though this is not enough, and I also need iron infusions.

That being said, my reasons for being omnivorous are also spiritual. I believe that, for myself and as an animist, plants are not worth more than animals and that I would rather eat mindfully than choose one over the other. I prefer to source vegetables that don't support slavery, and animals that haven't come from factory farms, over ones that aren't, though this is not always easy where I live. In some cases, I had to stop eating certain foods for some years until I could be sure of finding an organic, humane alternative.

My love and appreciation for plants is only growing through my experiences of OBOD, which if anything, makes it even harder to consume a whole plant, or to eat the fruit of a tree, knowing that its seeds will not be replanted to create new trees. But eating anything that lives is a difficult path, I think, for some, and it is through that path that I find increasing respect for my animal and plant kindred.

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Blyth
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Blyth » 16 Sep 2012, 15:05

What an interesting post! As a child, meat was not readily available due to war time shortages; when the proper stuff was first presented to me at about the age of 7, I didn't like the look or taste of it. I still don't like it. As you say, horses for courses [excuse the pun!] - it's my choice as it is for others.
"The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated."
— Mahatma Gandhi
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ecstaticearth
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby ecstaticearth » 16 Sep 2012, 23:53

I have been a vegetarian for a number of years now, and I also believe in the benefits of organics and a high raw diet.

Personally I feel, being a spiritually awake person and on the Druid path, that I am aware of the responsibilty I have in my actions, the choices I make have 'ripples on the pond', so to speak. By living an ethical life, being aware and responsible for my actions, and recognising the divinity that 'sparks' all creation, how could one live unconsciously eating and consuming those products that cause suffering unnecessarily.

It is my choice to be vegetarian, and I dont expect everyone to make my choices in life, but I do expect everyone to at least become aware of what they put into their bodies, and why, and the causes and outcomes of their choices. Then make your own decisions, as Druids, and as fellow creation, and intelligent beings with the capacity to reason and live responsibily.

We are not iron-age or ancient Druids, we are contempory Druids living modern-day lifestyles, living various degrees of harmony within the natural world, evolving consciously within higher consciousness, in a society that is technologically advanced and as Druids I feel we should borrow from the permaculturist term of appropriate-technology.

As Druids we project peace to all directions, shouldn't that peace extend to all living beings?

There's a famous quote that sugests that the state of humanity is reflected in the way we treat those of fur, feather, scale and claw. Just something to ponder on anyway.

... living by example... being the change I wish there to be in the world...

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Anais_Starwood
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Anais_Starwood » 22 Oct 2012, 23:12

Im a long term vegetarian and vegan for two years now. I didnt do it for spiritual reasons but more for environmental and health reasons. I'm not an animal rights activist but I appreciate that being Vegan spares a life or two. And thats pretty awesome.

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Dru
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Dru » 01 Nov 2012, 03:29

Big time carnivore here and have nothing against vegans and vegetarians. Never considered a vegetarian diet and probably never will unless ordered by a doctor. Not much in the way of getting organic meats that don't cost an arm and a leg around here so I get whats cheap and easy at the super market.

Dark Knight
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Dark Knight » 12 Jul 2014, 23:33

I admire the vegans who live off the land.
I admire the vegetarians who dairy can stand.
Then there are pescavores who live off the sea.
But I have nothing against omnivores like me. :old:

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Greytrack
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Greytrack » 06 Dec 2014, 11:50

This is a really interesting thread - mainly because I'm in the process of becoming a fully fledged veggie. :)

I've found (and I guess this is not an unusual consequence of living druidically) that as I've worked my way through the course, it has forced me to think long and hard about why I ate meat and where it came from. I just came to the conclusion that I have no particular rights to feed off another living being and whereas I accept totally that plants are living beings - well, I've got to eat something and tbh, it's easier to source organic fruit and veg than meat. Plus, I'm beginning to have a real reluctance to eat animals. Don't get me wrong - I have absolutely nothing against those who do, but for me living as much of a Druidic lifestyle as I possibly can means no meat. It helps that my daughter has been what I've called a natural vegetarian all her life. She's 24 now and never have I been able to persuade her to eat meat - even when she was tiny, so I'm used to catering for a veggie diet.

I've also been giving serious thought to natural skincare - stuff which I could make myself (which is another thread :D ) but it's interesting to me that it's only since I've been on the OBOD course that I've given much thought at all to these subjects. See, even old dogs can learn new tricks! lol! :old:
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Al Hakim
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Al Hakim » 07 Dec 2014, 20:48

Well, thinking about evolution I believe that humans are carnivores by nature. However, paleopaleontogists say that humanity survived because that species can even live on meatless food, too. Modern druidry does not give any rules on that. Perhaps, the best solution is a mixture - as usual. A strictly vegan diet, however, should be considered as hazardous to health.

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PeteBranduir
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby PeteBranduir » 09 Dec 2014, 02:18

For my part, I think of humans as just another animal. Looking at our evolution, we started as herbivorous primates but as we introduced more and more animal protein into our diets, starting with marrow and progressing to hunting it ourselves, our brains grew and our physiology changed. In short, meat made man. However it's important not to forget that even when we became hunters we remained gatherers. We need the nutrients from plants as much as from meat. So we are omnivores. It's also important to remember that our current evolutionary stage is still that of an animal for whom meat is not the main component. So the healthiest diet is vegetable based with a bit of animal protein and not, as current western culture would have us believe, meat as the headline act with veg as the supporting role.

I have other theories based on listening to what your body needs and being careful of what it simply wants but that's another story.

At the end of it, we're smart enough apes that we can choose to be vegetarian/vegan, still gett what we need, AND not try to force or guilt our choice onto others. Especially other animals who need meat. (I'm hugely against vegan pet food for dogs and cats for example)
If at first you don't succeed, I hope it wasn't brain surgery.

Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.


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