Vegetarianism

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eeepapillon
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby eeepapillon » 11 Feb 2011, 12:50

I think it depends on the kid, like it depends on people in general. You can't make someone care about something they don't want to care about.
Going vegetarian/vegan or buying organic probably isn't on the agenda of every kid/teenager, but then again in mainstream society how many adults do you find making similar choices? It probably depends on where you come from. Where I come from, it doesn't happen much. I meet more people my own age or younger making such choices than older people. I can't think of anyone over 30 who I've met personally in day-to-day life who buys organic, deliberately sources food locally or is a vegetarian/vegan. Most of the time people just cling to the age old myth "You can't be healthy on a vegetarian diet, you need meat to survive". Does that phrase annoy anyone else apart from me? It infuriates me. Anyway.

I think to an extent as well...there's a bit of a stereotype/stigma accompanying food choices like these. In the case of organic supermarkets, at least where I'm from (and Adelaide only has a population of about 2 million which, compared to some places is quite tiny!) those supermarkets are exclusive places. Your average joe-blow who likes to have a few down the pub with the boys after work doesn't shop there. They're always filled with slightly upper middle class housewives with their manicured nails and their freshly permed hair. Not only that, but the food is more expensive that its non-organic counter part, which by the way annoys me sooo much because it just shouldn't be that way, but it is that way because more people buy non-organic than organic thereby pushing the prices of non organic down. Though I did read somewhere that if organic food was bought in the majority the average price of food would be cheaper than it is now because it costs less to produce food organically. Anyway! I'm getting side-tracked from the point! Point is vegetarianism, locavorism and buying organic food has somehow recieved this opinion that it's only for wealthier people and hippies ('greenies' whatever you wanna call them), and it's not something the mainstream population should take part in. The biggest issue, I think, to encourage a healthier planet is how to change that.
Least that's me. :)

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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby DJ Droood » 11 Feb 2011, 13:50

Point is vegetarianism, locavorism and buying organic food has somehow recieved this opinion that it's only for wealthier people and hippies ('greenies' whatever you wanna call them), and it's not something the mainstream population should take part in. The biggest issue, I think, to encourage a healthier planet is how to change that.
Least that's me. :)
great point....some things are always sold as "uncool" to the kids by the media...intelligence and education, for instance...."Nerds" and "bookworms" have been standard comedic targets for decades....and if you are a vegetarian, you are a hippie, tree hugger, skinny and unhealthy, and probably don't like country music, God and your country. (btw, *never* go on a veg diet if your goal is to lose weight!). I am beginning to think it makes corporations more money to have people stupid, unhealthy and polluting the earth....
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby eeepapillon » 12 Feb 2011, 13:27

[quote="DJ Droood"]if you are a vegetarian, you are a hippie, tree hugger, skinny and unhealthy, and probably don't like country music [quote]

Hear, hear! I am sick and tired of people telling me I can't listen to Keith Urban when I want to! Gosh darn it, it's my right! Don't turn that Alison Krauss CD down in my presence, you WILL turn it back up. From this day forward I will not tolerate persecution for being vegetarian and liking the sound of a banjo! I'm making a stand!

...On a more serious note,
money makes the world go round (so I'm told) so it only makes sense to have ignorant and unhealthy people as the guinea pigs that buy the products, in this case, food. If I were running a corporation that was based on slowly crippling and destroying the planet I'd want my consumers to be ignorant too.

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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby DJ Droood » 13 Feb 2011, 22:14

I hope your countries have better standards than mine!
Study finds drug-resistant bacteria in Canadian supermarket chicken

About 67 percent of chicken has harmful bacteria, according to a study conducted by “Marketplace,” a Canadian consumer advocacy newsmagazine that is broadcast on CBC Television.

“Marketplace” researchers wanted to test grocery store chicken for harmful, drug-resistant bacteria and bought 100 samples of poultry from supermarket chains in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal. The samples included some of the “most familiar names in the poultry business,” says CBC News.

Lab analysis of the chicken found that two-thirds, or 67 percent, had bacteria. But the surprise wasn’t just the E. coli, salmonella and campylobacter bacteria found in the chicken. Rather it was that all of the bacteria was resistant to at least one antibiotic.

Even more frightening, the researchers found some of the bacteria had resistance to “six, seven, or even eight different types of antibiotics.”

In interviews with “Marketplace,” doctors and scientists said that the problem could be the result of chicken farmers giving too many antibiotics to their chickens, to make them stay healthy and speed up the growth process.
http://www.ecanadanow.com/health/2011/0 ... nt-page-1/
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby MissBotanicals » 25 Mar 2011, 18:20

I personally don't think vegetarianism is a part of Druidry. It's only down to how the individual feels. I became vegetarian wayy before I even discovered that Druidry exists. And right now, I don't think it has anything to do with it. My reason for becoming vegetarian was my concern for animals - I didn't like how animals were treated in slaughter houses, though I realise now that with some research you can find meat which comes from animals that were cared for and killed humanly. I just wouldn't be able to go back to eating meat, the smell and even the thought that I am eating the flesh of an animal kinda makes me feel a little sick.
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby DJ Droood » 25 Mar 2011, 19:31

I personally don't think vegetarianism is a part of Druidry.
It is sort of a moot point...very few of us will ever give up our meat, cars or flying...there are always ways to justify our behaviour...dismiss "global warming" as a scam, etc....make sure we have reusale shopping bags....Druidry is mostly about meditating, buying books, "self improvement", driving to events and lighting candles, so I would have to agree with your assesment. I'm certainly no different.

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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby MissBotanicals » 25 Mar 2011, 22:30

I personally don't think vegetarianism is a part of Druidry.
It is sort of a moot point...very few of us will ever give up our meat, cars or flying...there are always ways to justify our behaviour...dismiss "global warming" as a scam, etc....make sure we have reusale shopping bags....Druidry is mostly about meditating, buying books, "self improvement", driving to events and lighting candles, so I would have to agree with your assesment. I'm certainly no different.
I agree, especially living in the 21st century and in the western world. It's quite hard to avoid things which we know damages the environment in some shape or form. When I was little my family didn't have much money at all, never had holidays, didn't have a computer, had to heat water using the fire...even had to go outside to use the toilet. However I wouldn't be able to go back to that. It's not to say any of us are less of a Druid. I personally think Druidry helps those of us in the western world to really think about what we do and make as many changes as possible. I now think about what I consume, where I purchase things from, if things are tested on animals, and I recycle as much as possible. They may be small changes, but I like to think they help.
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby DJ Droood » 26 Mar 2011, 11:34

They may be small changes, but I like to think they help.
I have to agree with you...my observations are the same....druidry is not about radical things like giving up meat or your car, it is more about the smaller things that make us feel like we are making a difference, like buying phosphate-free laundry detergent and participating in Earth Hour.
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby chadly » 27 Mar 2011, 00:56

Right now, for Lent, my church (liberal Christian denomination) is encouraging its members to fast from something every Thursday, to end on Maundy Thursday (the Thursday before Easter). For me, I have chosen to fast from meat every Thursday, in which I only eat vegetarian foods on Thursdays. It is a spiritual practice to, as some have stated before, make myself more aware of what I am putting into my body, recognize spiritual solidarity with my animal neighbors, and help the environment by not contributing to the meat industry and its associated mistreatment of animals and carbon footprint via transportation of products, etc. At least for that one day a week. I will likely continue the practice after Lent by participating in a movement called "Meatless Mondays", which was begun more from a health standard, but also can be viewed with the same aforementioned spiritual standpoint as well - my decision to continue it on Mondays is primarily one of semantics (the name is easy to think of, and therefore, remember to practice), and the fact that Mondays are typically less busy days in my schedule and therefore may have a little more time to put more effort into my cooking.

This practice is one of many along the continuum of omnivore (on one end) and vegan(on the other). It is called Flexitarianism, in which either one is primarily vegetarian, but eats meat occasionally, or is generally a meat eater, but also engages in vegetarian eating on occasion. There are varying levels of Flexitarianism, and a practitioner does so for various personal/spiritual reasons. There's also Pollotarians, who eat poultry but not red meat, and pescetarians, who eat seafood, but not red meat or poultry. Just like most things, I find all or any of the above fit well within Druidry, if the Druid in question engages in such eating habits from that particular spiritual viewpoint. So, no need to feel like you HAVE to go full-out vegetarian - if you feel as though you need to change your eating habits, there are other options as well!

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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby DJ Droood » 27 Mar 2011, 12:56

Just like most things, I find all or any of the above fit well within Druidry, if the Druid in question engages in such eating habits from that particular spiritual viewpoint. So, no need to feel like you HAVE to go full-out vegetarian - if you feel as though you need to change your eating habits, there are other options as well!
And I think you hit the note here, regarding druidry...although it is nice to think that druidry can save the planet and protect mother nature and the environment and our fellow creatures, that is really not a central theme...it is more about what we do for ourselves, spiritually...the various techniques and observances that make us *feel* like we are "connected" (however we define that) with nature, or god...perhaps that is even too outward looking....it makes us feel connected more to ourselves.

My argument here had been, originally, that evaluated honestly, the modern meat industry is a polluting, destructive horrorshow for not only the animals, but the whole planet..it is near the top of the list of human activities in terms of environmental destruction. I am guilty of viewing druidry as a spirituality that encourages you to make personal decisions based on the needs of the collective...how do my actions effect everyone else...but I am reminded again and again that it is a personal path, and about individual choice, and connection to that which is inside of us.

I have to admit, I don't eat meat because it is the easiest thing I could think of doing that would make a significant difference...I am far too lazy to give up my vehicle, although that lies within the realm of feasibility, and too much of a selfish hedonist to give up air travel. Not eating a KFC Double Down (and her sisters) is the least I can do. Seriously, the very least.
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby MissBotanicals » 27 Mar 2011, 19:32

Just like most things, I find all or any of the above fit well within Druidry, if the Druid in question engages in such eating habits from that particular spiritual viewpoint. So, no need to feel like you HAVE to go full-out vegetarian - if you feel as though you need to change your eating habits, there are other options as well!
And I think you hit the note here, regarding druidry...although it is nice to think that druidry can save the planet and protect mother nature and the environment and our fellow creatures, that is really not a central theme...it is more about what we do for ourselves, spiritually...the various techniques and observances that make us *feel* like we are "connected" (however we define that) with nature, or god...perhaps that is even too outward looking....it makes us feel connected more to ourselves.

My argument here had been, originally, that evaluated honestly, the modern meat industry is a polluting, destructive horrorshow for not only the animals, but the whole planet..it is near the top of the list of human activities in terms of environmental destruction. I am guilty of viewing druidry as a spirituality that encourages you to make personal decisions based on the needs of the collective...how do my actions effect everyone else...but I am reminded again and again that it is a personal path, and about individual choice, and connection to that which is inside of us.

I have to admit, I don't eat meat because it is the easiest thing I could think of doing that would make a significant difference...I am far too lazy to give up my vehicle, although that lies within the realm of feasibility, and too much of a selfish hedonist to give up air travel. Not eating a KFC Double Down (and her sisters) is the least I can do. Seriously, the very least.
Nicely said. :) I think at the end of the day it's so much easier to live a certain way when you were brought up like that, I haven't gotten my driving license so I obviously don't have a car. I was planning on it, until I became more aware of the environment and the fact that I get some much needed exercise by walking home from work. If I had a car, I probably wouldn't part with it though because of the convenience. But because I don't have one, I dont miss it. In todays world it is a huge thing to give up, especially if you live miles away from work or the nearest town. The way I look at it, we can only try our best. The small things soon add up.
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Marthe » 28 Mar 2011, 09:10

I stopped eating meat some years ago now. I was studying in Scotland during the mad cow disease outbreak and watching the bloated dead cows being piled up and burned made me feel sick. And sorry for the cows. So I decided to stop eating anything that came from a cow. Some months later I decided to cut out pork as well. I had had time to think about the whole vegetarian thing and I had tried it for one week but got so hungry I had to start eating meat again. Mainly because I didn't know what to cook instead. But after a lot of talk on the news about what medicine the pigs are given I decided once and for all to cut out pork. I still ate chicken and with a bit of 'research' I found out what vegetables I could supplement with. After a while the whole 'eating meat' thing seemed discusting to me so I decided to stop eating chicken as well. I do still eat fish and I sometimes think I am a bit pathetic because fish are living creatures as well but I am also concerned about getting the right amount of nutrients and vitamins. So for now I eat fish.

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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby MissBotanicals » 28 Mar 2011, 21:31

I stopped eating meat some years ago now. I was studying in Scotland during the mad cow disease outbreak and watching the bloated dead cows being piled up and burned made me feel sick. And sorry for the cows. So I decided to stop eating anything that came from a cow. Some months later I decided to cut out pork as well. I had had time to think about the whole vegetarian thing and I had tried it for one week but got so hungry I had to start eating meat again. Mainly because I didn't know what to cook instead. But after a lot of talk on the news about what medicine the pigs are given I decided once and for all to cut out pork. I still ate chicken and with a bit of 'research' I found out what vegetables I could supplement with. After a while the whole 'eating meat' thing seemed discusting to me so I decided to stop eating chicken as well. I do still eat fish and I sometimes think I am a bit pathetic because fish are living creatures as well but I am also concerned about getting the right amount of nutrients and vitamins. So for now I eat fish.
I was the same, I gradually cut out meat over a certain period of time but still ate chicken. And then finally decided to become vegetarian. Never was much of meat or fish person anyway. I loved chicken though, but a year and three months on and I haven't had a single craving. :) For me it was easier than I expected, especially when others told me I would never be able to become vegetarian because "humans are supposed to eat meat". :-|
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Frenn » 29 Mar 2011, 14:55

I just wouldn't be able to go back to eating meat, the smell and even the thought that I am eating the flesh of an animal kinda makes me feel a little sick.
The smell of cooked/cooking meat sickens me and brings back some bad memories. Everytime I smell it, I smell burning flesh again. I can understand the moral stand against eating meat, as well as the supposed health benefits, but its the stench that slays me.
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Ivy Leaf » 08 Apr 2011, 16:47

I personally don't think vegetarianism is a part of Druidry. It's only down to how the individual feels. I became vegetarian wayy before I even discovered that Druidry exists.
Same here. I discovered Druidry 4 years ago and by then, I had been a vegetarian for 6 years.

To me, it is down to how the individual feels as well. In this case, being drawn to Druidry was something it would happen sooner or later. I've always felt a penchant for Nature, animals and plants (I still treasure all of the books on animals I got when I was a child) and even though I live in a semi-urban area, living in the countryside is something I would really enjoy. Plus, I love herbalism and stuff related to alternative medicines/ways of living.

With this I mean, there's a thin line linking many parts of "my self" and they're all rooted around the same ideas. Being interested in Druidry, becoming vegetarian or using herbal remedies could have happened at different moments in my life and in a different order, but in the end, they were (and are) all a part of me. I sometimes feel they were always there, just waiting for the right moment to click, give them a name and start bubbling... :wink:

(Sorry if this hasn't made any sense...I'm forgetting my English).

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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Argenta » 11 Apr 2011, 10:26

With this I mean, there's a thin line linking many parts of "my self" and they're all rooted around the same ideas. Being interested in Druidry, becoming vegetarian or using herbal remedies could have happened at different moments in my life and in a different order, but in the end, they were (and are) all a part of me. I sometimes feel they were always there, just waiting for the right moment to click, give them a name and start bubbling... :wink:

(Sorry if this hasn't made any sense...I'm forgetting my English).
No, actually, this last paragraph made SO much sense... wonderfully written, and saying something I haven't had the words for until now.
Thanks a lot :shake:
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby mwyalchen » 11 Apr 2011, 11:32

Flexitarianism, in which either one is primarily vegetarian, but eats meat occasionally, or is generally a meat eater, but also engages in vegetarian eating on occasion. ... There's also Pollotarians, who eat poultry but not red meat, and pescetarians, who eat seafood, but not red meat or poultry.
You missed out insects:
...By 2030, the world's population will have reached eight billion, a figure the world's meat farms might not be able to feed. Mass insect farming could provide a more sustainable food source.

Insects are high in protein, relatively low in calories, and cause much less environmental damage than cattle. A meal made from silkworms is, pound for pound, just as nutritious as a beef steak, but farming the worms would require seven times less feed, far less water, and creates no methane footprint.

MasterChef Thomasina Miers has created a three course meal, starting with worm crisps, followed by grasshopper salsa tacos and cricket tostados topped with pecorino, radish and orange – and finishing with chocolate-coated locusts for pudding.

"The packet says they're like popcorn with a difference," winces Bennett-Jones, after a worm crisp: "I would stress the difference."

"A bit like crunchy anchovies," says another guest about the crickets. I grab some tostadas. They're juicy, salty and have plenty of texture. I have eaten the future, and it tastes delicious.
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby chadly » 11 Apr 2011, 21:41

Ok, in that case, by 2030 I will be TOTALLY vegetarian! No bugs for me!

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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby CedarMist » 17 Apr 2011, 05:31

I think what really did vegetarianism for me (stopped me making excuses about torture, food shortages, the environment, etc) was that when I sit down to a meal, I say a grace which is more-or-less "Thank you for your sacrifice. May your body live on through me and your spirit return to the Creator." Or such-and-such.

But since I was sort of talking to the animal anyways, it made me think what the animal would think if it was alive and an Anglophone? Probably something along the lines of "You're thanking me? You B**** don't THANK me! Give me my life back! You can live on tofu!" I couldn't justify thanking an animal for a 'sacrifice' which was really an indulgence. I'll be able to live with myself for that again only if it's life-or-death.
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Re: Vegetarianism

Postby Myrde » 13 May 2011, 17:02

But since I was sort of talking to the animal anyways, it made me think what the animal would think if it was alive and an Anglophone? Probably something along the lines of "You're thanking me? You B**** don't THANK me! Give me my life back! You can live on tofu!" I couldn't justify thanking an animal for a 'sacrifice' which was really an indulgence. I'll be able to live with myself for that again only if it's life-or-death.
Ooh, that post had so much win incorperated into it.

For me, I'm an omnivore with an unusual philosiphy. Forgive me, because Im about to steal from Disney. But I adhere to the "Circle of Life" concept. Every single living being lives because it consumes Life. I have no qualms about eating fish, bird, beast and plant alike. Does or should the fox feel guilt for claiming the life of a hen to feed itself and it's young? What about the dolphin who feeds on schools or fish, or the whale that devours hundreds of krill in a single bite?

However there is an understanding and awareness, and what's more, the respect that should be given to the animal for giving (whether willingly or not) it's life so that I might live.

I eat as organic and as green as possible. I want to know where my food comes from, and I support my local farmers as much as possible. There's nothing like meeting the chicken you'll get to know even MORE closely later that night at dinner. :whistle:

But at the same time, I need to understand that I my own life may one day be taken. I must accept this fact. I have seen a deer lower its head in acceptance to the hunter's bow, but how many of us would lower our's to the maws of other creatures. Even if I live to an old age and die in a hospital, one day, my body will taken back into the soil (or scattered to the winds) and plants will grow from it, creatures will eat those plants, and the cycle continues.

It's the blatant diregard to this cycle, to consume without understanding where, how or why this happens and without respecting the creature or having the resolve to accept the cycle that most people seem to practice.

Moral of the story: Respect and understand what you eat and why! Life consumes life, but respect the life and give your own when the time comes.


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