Page 2 of 2

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 31 Jul 2008, 19:47
by Davi
Hi Kernos,

Thnks for the heads up. I didn't know Piggot's book was outdated for such a long time, but then again, like I said, I'm not a Celtic scholar. Do you know anything about Lewis Spence book being outdated too? I try searching the history of the book online but couldn't find anything about it being outdated, that's why I posted too. I'd love to know if it is or not, because when I read it, the information on it seems to be so true.

Thanks Again,
Davi

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 01 Aug 2008, 01:27
by Kernos
Davi wrote:Hi Kernos,

Thnks for the heads up. I didn't know Piggot's book was outdated for such a long time, but then again, like I said, I'm not a Celtic scholar. Do you know anything about Lewis Spence book being outdated too? I try searching the history of the book online but couldn't find anything about it being outdated, that's why I posted too. I'd love to know if it is or not, because when I read it, the information on it seems to be so true.

Thanks Again,
Davi
Spence wrote from a revivalist point of view. EG, he considered Iolo Morganwg's Barddas to be a genuine ancient source. But he is fascinating to read. It depends on what you want. As a scholarly work it has to be approached with much caution. From a mystery or spiritual point of view it can open new doors and stimulate new ideas (like Barddas). I am not sure I would consider it a beginner's book.

But, this all depends on one's approach. I work from either primary sources or their most current interpretations and try to keep up with new scholarly information and theories coming from the linguists and archeologists, taking these with a strong dose of skepticism as fact. I then use this foundation as a stimulus for developing my own spiritual points of view and to develop my own mysteries. Others may better do it the other way around. But,I think it important not to confuse one with t'other :)

:zen:

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 21 Aug 2008, 16:28
by Ainevar
Yeah I know what U mean with Piggot. Hey it helps. should have looked here like a year ago.

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 23 Aug 2008, 02:45
by eilis
Some of us have been developing a book list / reading group on GoodReads.com
It is more conducive to that purpose. Please join and add your books to the list!
http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/6135.Druidry

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 24 Aug 2008, 04:38
by Damascus-Templar
For pure delight, I recommend Mary Stuart's "Merlin Trilogy."

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 24 Aug 2008, 06:59
by Twig
Wow -- I missed this thread somehow. A veritable treasure chest...

For the totally brand-new, babe-in-the-woods book which is not overly heavy in mythology but focuses more on learning the wheel of the year, I suggest Celtic Wisdom: Seasonal Rituals and Festivals by Vivianne Crowley. This is a slim, beautifully-presented tome which is useful, but also makes one want to delve into things a bit further.

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 24 Aug 2008, 14:55
by Kernos
eilis wrote:Some of us have been developing a book list / reading group on GoodReads.com
It is more conducive to that purpose. Please join and add your books to the list!
http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/6135.Druidry
Thanks for this Eilis. I did not know it exited. It has lots of possibilities, especially for focused groups.

:zen:

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 25 Aug 2008, 11:07
by dreamguardian
There's some great suggestions here. A lot of books are usually written assuming the reader has some knowledge.

For me a great book that I always go back to that keeps things simple & what inspired me to seek out druidry in particular within paganism is:

Celtic Wisdom by Andy Baggott

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Celtic-Wisdom-P ... 716&sr=8-1

Peace

Rob

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 08 Jun 2011, 19:06
by Lyf
Hey all, kinda new to this. Wasn't sure if I should post in this thread or create a new one, so please bear with me.
There's a lot of wonderful recommendations here, but I am trying to avoid collecting more material objects than I absolutely need (really limited space, moving around a lot, etc), so I really like to keep my books in a digital format whenever possible. So I wondered if anyone had any reading recommendations that are available for purchase in an ebook format?

Thanks :)

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 07 Sep 2011, 21:18
by anemone
I've read all your tips in this topic with recommended books, took notes and added them to my own shortlist.....

Still it is hard to decide what to choose, and I don't want to buy every book immediately ( I only have one addiction and that is bóóks... :???: I try to control myself...) So I'm asking some help from you....

I've got:
* 'Druidry' by Emma Restall-Orr (good for a nice short introduction)
* 'Anam Cara' by John O'Donohue ( what caught my attention because of the mild vision and to inspire me)

I'm pretty new to Druidry as a name, but not in the way I live my life. I'm not religious but I do believe every living thing/creature has a soul/spirit (and that includes stones). I tell this to make it easier to help me with choosing a book. :)

I want to choose 1 or 2 books from the following list:
* Druid Priestess: An intimate journey through the pagan year –Emma Restall Orr
* Living Druidry: Magical Spirituality for the Wild Soul by Emma Restall Orr
*The Elements of the Celtic Tradition by Caitlin Matthews
* Druid Mysteries: Ancient Wisdom for the 21st Century by Philip Carr-Gomm
* The druid way by Philip Carr-Gomm
* The elements of the druid tradition by Philip Carr-Gomm

I hope someone will help, thanx in advance :curtsey:

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 07 Sep 2011, 22:23
by LoneWalker
I'm no expert anemone and I can only comment on the two I've got: Druid Priestess is very much a personal account of her experience told as a series of scenes with background to explain what is going on at the different festivals. It's fascinating and certainly helps you feel what Restall-Orr's druidry is all about.

Druid Mysteries is equally good but completely different - its more of a description, starting with some of the history and moving on to what druidry is about today, there are good exercises at the end of the chapters.

I really like both but they give a very different feel for what you're getting into so it depends on what you want. Hopefully someone else can offer some sager advice. :)

Re: Personally Recommended Books for Neophytes

Posted: 08 Sep 2011, 07:23
by anemone
Thanks for your advice LoneWalker, you describe the difference very well and I think it is good to look at things from different point of views. And exactly the 2 books you picked out already had an extra 'point' from myself.

Any other advice/idea from someone else is indeed welcome!