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Re: A deer comes out of nowhere.

Posted: 28 Jun 2013, 12:21
by DaRC
I now consider such events as chance (or sometimes sought out) encounters with other persons (human and otherwise), and that is more cosmic to me.
I suppose where you see chance I see patterns; but some of the patterns are so fractal and complex that I've not a chance of understanding them.
Others, through observation over time, are familiar and can be used for simple Augury; e.g. should I go out for a walk / ride in the countryside this evening?
The call of a Herring Gull landing on a neighbours house says No. The pattern is that Gulls only come inland when bad weather is brewing.

Re: A deer comes out of nowhere.

Posted: 28 Jun 2013, 20:27
by katie bridgewater
DaRC wrote: I suppose where you see chance I see patterns;
I never said I don't see patterns. This is a discussion about personal messages, and not the mathematical nature of the universe! Understanding that nature is full of patterns and chance things are often based on reason is fundamental to integrating oneself with the rest of the cosmos. I just don't happen to think that everything (predictable or not) is a metaphorical message aimed at humans, and I find it and unnecessary to always need some kind of 'answer' about something in order to live a full and spiritual existence! Sometimes, flipping a coin is a good way to make a decision, when we are unable to make one based on what we feel like doing for ourselves. And sometimes a deer crossing a road is just a deer crossing the road. Sometimes, it is natural to use an occurence in nature to determine something in our own life, but that is in the mind of the believer, and not IMO a message from any entity or intelligence outside of the physical universe. If it were, it's a manipulative act by a being/entity who won't reveal themselves and therefore, may or may not be trustworthy!

Today the rooks are back in the field outside, congregating before roosting. I have no idea where they have been meeting at twilight over the last 2 months. I know people who would think that was about them. It's just that I don't.

Re: A deer comes out of nowhere.

Posted: 29 Jun 2013, 10:06
by WrenWyrd
I would agree that animals do not spend their lives carrying messages around for humans. I prefer to focus on communication: when you come into contact with a wild being (and it could also be a tree or a stone) something is communicated by the encounter. It follows that you can make your own meaning out of it. If the dear "spoke" to you, what did the deer say, i.e. what did you perceive from your encounter with the deer and what does it mean to you?

Sometimes, I do believe that animals communicate with us in a more direct way. A friend told me that once, when he was snowshoeing alone in the Alps, a chamois he hadn't seen startled him by "barking" at him (it sounds like a raw sort of barking, I'm not sure what it's called). He took it to mean that there was danger ahead and he shouldn't continue - he felt that very strongly, and turned around and went home.

In most cases however, I think it's mainly about us not being used to contact with the wild. Animals live everywhere around us whether we see them or not, and I would much rather work to reestablish communication with them rather than turn them into symbols. There is sacredness in that attitude also.

Re: A deer comes out of nowhere.

Posted: 29 Jun 2013, 10:47
by katie bridgewater
Kima wrote:I would agree that animals do not spend their lives carrying messages around for humans. I prefer to focus on communication: when you come into contact with a wild being (and it could also be a tree or a stone) something is communicated by the encounter. It follows that you can make your own meaning out of it. If the dear "spoke" to you, what did the deer say, i.e. what did you perceive from your encounter with the deer and what does it mean to you?

Sometimes, I do believe that animals communicate with us in a more direct way. A friend told me that once, when he was snowshoeing alone in the Alps, a chamois he hadn't seen startled him by "barking" at him (it sounds like a raw sort of barking, I'm not sure what it's called). He took it to mean that there was danger ahead and he shouldn't continue - he felt that very strongly, and turned around and went home.

In most cases however, I think it's mainly about us not being used to contact with the wild. Animals live everywhere around us whether we see them or not, and I would much rather work to reestablish communication with them rather than turn them into symbols. There is sacredness in that attitude also.

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