Generalizations

In the Druid tradition, each of the great “rites of passage” is marked in the calendar by one of the fire-festivals: death, or Parting, is marked by Samhuinn, 31 October to 2 November, when the old Celtic year ends and there are three days of No-Time before the new year begins. Birth, and consequently Naming, is marked by Imbolc on 1/2 February—the time when the snowdrops appear and we can sense the first stirrings of spring. Mating, the Great Rite of making love, is marked by Bealteinne on 1 May, when the forces of spring are in full flood. Marriage, the formal recognition of having found a long term partner after the explorations of the spring time of one's life, is marked by Lughnasadh on 1 August. This forum is for discussing the ceremonies and customs associated with each festival and for all of the rites of passage in our lives.
Forum rules
If you find a topic of interest and want to continue the discussion then start a new topic under The Hearthfire with a similar name and add a link back to the topic you want to continue.
To copy a link just copy the url on the top left of your browser and then put in your post, highlight it and press the url button.
MiriamSPia
Posts: 128
Joined: 26 Sep 2010, 16:31
Gender: Female
Contact:

Generalizations

Postby MiriamSPia » 18 Dec 2010, 15:35

What is challenging about this for me, is that it just makes Druidry some religion, like all other religions in that there is a desire and need for rites of passage marking birth, naming, adulthood, marriage, parenthood, old age perhaps, and death. This isn't wrong or bad, but it does seem almost odd to see how the same it is...

User avatar
Donata
OBOD Druid
Posts: 7978
Joined: 22 Apr 2003, 17:37
Gender: Female
Location: Watching the seasons change in the woods at my home in Western NY
Contact:

Re: Generalizations

Postby Donata » 18 Dec 2010, 16:18

As I see it, humans have a built in desire or need to mark important passages in their lives. This isn't necessarily religious! In purely civil context, we celebrate a birth and successive birthdays, especially ones seen as important - adulthood, variably 18 or 21 (or other depending on the culture), graduation ceremonies, retirement parties, civil marriages, funerals (not always religious/spiritual) etc. We want to mark important dates and events, and we do this in purely mundane ways as well as spiritual ones. We want to share our important passages and events with others, and we want their acknowledgment of our event and its importance in our lives.

I can think of several totally mundane 'traditions' of some of the above: handing out cigars at the birth of a child, receiving a 'gold watch' at retirement plus the party itself, memoralizing a death with an obituary in the paper, announcement of engagement or marriage in the paper, most birthday celebrations, the idea of a young man getting drunk when he's of legal age (I didn't say I 'approve' of all of these!), burning the mortgage papers when it's paid off, etc. I've known of divorce 'celebrations'.
I've taken part in 'croning' celebrations to mark entering into another phase of life - these can have spiritual overtones or not.

OBOD as a spiritual path is wise to offer a choice of ceremonies we can use or not. Most of us in OBOD recognize a Source or Spirit, so why not satisfy our spirituality at the same time we satisfy our inborn desire for a ceremony to mark the passages of our lives?

BB
Donata
In some mysterious and wonderful way you are part of everything. And in that same mysterious and wonderful way, everything is a part of you. ---Nippawanock, ARAPAHOE

If I destroy you, I destroy myself. If I honor you, I honor myself. --- Hunbatz Men, MAYAN ELDER

http://www.ChrysalisHeartCenter.com
http://www.Donata.ChrysalisHeartCenter.com

The Medicine Wheel: Path of the Heart (book available through Amazon.com)


ImageImage ImageImage

Image

User avatar
wolf560
Posts: 786
Joined: 27 Aug 2010, 23:06
Gender: Male
Location: Arizona, USA
Contact:

Re: Generalizations

Postby wolf560 » 18 Dec 2010, 18:53

Does it necessarily HAVE to be religious?

Gatherings are always a good thing and the more reasons to gather just means we get to celebrate more often. To be able to share successes and achievements (or maybe a new brand of mead) means that the world is maybe just a little better than the day before.

Also, I find that anytime I am gathered with more than a few other Pagans that I have the opportunity to discuss things and learn from them.
.
The Druids wrote nothing down, and memorized everything...
/|\ Mark /|\

Image Image
2011 BS
Speakers Corner (Sep 2011) A lesson in the Ogham
Divination method; The Awen Stones

Guild Chief; ADF Scholars Guild, Scribe GotRP ADF, Bandarach Council member, NOD Council member


ImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Cwm
Posts: 35
Joined: 31 Aug 2009, 20:14
Gender: Male

Re: Generalizations

Postby Cwm » 18 Dec 2010, 22:04

I don't understand Wolfs point. Could he be a lot clearer and link it with the posting please?

User avatar
wolf560
Posts: 786
Joined: 27 Aug 2010, 23:06
Gender: Male
Location: Arizona, USA
Contact:

Re: Generalizations

Postby wolf560 » 19 Dec 2010, 00:13

I don't understand Wolfs point. Could he be a lot clearer and link it with the posting please?
LOL... too funny.... I shall expand upon my posting ... :wizard:

"does it have to be religious"- that means I do not feel that rites of passage have to be religiously connected for them to be important to someone. A birthday party (which by definition is the quintessential "rite of passage" is hardly a religious event)

"Gatherings...to share in successes and achievements..."- that means I feel that we can gather in celebration of an event without necessarily having to don woolen cloaks and walk deosil around a fire chanting in a dark language. We can simply gather to toast the success of someone we like.

The generalization that began this thread was aimed at the thought that to some this OBOD or Druidic thing was just like any other religion perhaps.
What is challenging about this...is that it makes Druidry some religion...need for rites of passage ...but it does seem almost odd to see how the same it is...
What I guess you failed to see was that I was telling the original poster that one does not have to wrap rites of passage up into anything "religious" that they can be a celebration of the moment without even a need for ritual all the time.

Also as an underlying tone was the hope that people would write things for the rites of passage (or any other important event they chose to do) with an eye towards some individuality and spontaneity. To perhaps write a new ritual for each thing so that every one is not only different but somehow special and an event to remember.

Sometimes the best "rituals" are the ones that are not written down or rehearsed but rather sung from the heart of the person making the impromptu toast that leads into a circle of drumming.... the innovative few words one says that sparks another to pull out their guitar and render a song for the occasion....

This by definition is the "Spark of Imbas" (AKA "Awen" for some) that the Filidecht was known for in Ancient times.... that the Bard, the Skald, and Seannachie was most noted for even unto more modern times....

Howz that? :panther:
.
The Druids wrote nothing down, and memorized everything...
/|\ Mark /|\

Image Image
2011 BS
Speakers Corner (Sep 2011) A lesson in the Ogham
Divination method; The Awen Stones

Guild Chief; ADF Scholars Guild, Scribe GotRP ADF, Bandarach Council member, NOD Council member


ImageImageImageImage

envelope
Posts: 40
Joined: 04 Nov 2011, 03:38
Gender: Female
Contact:

Re: Generalizations

Postby envelope » 29 Nov 2011, 06:23

Hehe, yeah, I know what you mean. Personally, I know I will never participate in a ritual or ceremony or wear something or speak in a manner or act some way that isn't meaningful and either mine from creation, or mine by genuine acceptance and benefit. Otherwise, it would seem like just another religion or a bit gimmicky, to me. Hmm, most religions do seem a bit gimmicky as well (to me), come to think of it. I think any path can be yours, though, or force fed to you - I think it is your decision to see it one way or another, and your act of will to either remain or walk away from something based on how true it feels to you. To remain when it feels empty is to be force fed, to be untrue in the gravest of ways, and to leave when it feels true is to be afraid. Doing anything when you know it is right for you is the path of your own, and the only one you can deeply and truly follow. At least, that's my perspective.

So, uh, yeah, if you hate your birthdays, celebrate your unbirthdays. You get a lot more presents that way. :grin:

Preston
Posts: 3
Joined: 08 Dec 2011, 14:52
Gender: Male
Contact:

Re: Generalizations

Postby Preston » 09 Dec 2011, 10:54

Nobody likes to be lumped into some homogenous mass, with all individuality stripped away, yet people do it every day - especially around here. "Why do all lesbians look like men?" "Why do all gays speak with a lisp?" "Why are all transwomen ugly/hot/whatever?" "Why are all Republicans homophobic?" When people are caught in something like that, they complain loudly about it, but they're just as likely to turn around and do it to someone else. As a former high school teacher, it makes me despair of my profession. It seems as though critical thinking skills are vanishing. Anybody have any idea why?

DC.Seeker

Re: Generalizations

Postby DC.Seeker » 06 Jun 2015, 09:51

Hi everyone. Please forgive me if this question is out of place, as this is my first time on this forum and I was looking for a place where I could ask this. I've been looking at different Druid Orders. Oh, I'll get to it. I'm a monotheist. I'm not a Christian...I don't believe in a trinity. I see Deity as an all-pervasive Ever-Living Energy that stretches throughout Eternity and the Cosmos. Now, here is my question. In other Druid Orders, they seem to be pretty much Neo-Pagan and invoke the names of gods and goddesses that are Celtic traditional deities. I have nothing against people doing what they want to do religiously. But my question is this...at a gathering of this Order, the OBOD, if someone took part in a ritual -- such as initiations, for example -- are they spiritually neutral? I ask this because in the website it seems to make it clear that the Order is open to all. But it would be really uncomfortable for a Neo-Pagan to end up in a ritual in which suddenly he or she had to subscribe to a monotheistic invocation...or vice versa. Do you see what I am saying? I love nature. I'm a pesco-vegetarian. I was raised on National Geographic and a major respect for nature since childhood. And I have studied and practiced forms of Kabbalistic and other forms of white and grey, Right Hand Path magick. I'd LOVE to learn more about Druidry and even become initiated into a Druidic tradition. But I would be insincere if I told you that I'd feel completely comfortable uttering prayers to deities in which I do not believe or adhere to. Is there anyone in the OBOD out there that's been initiated that could help me, please? Much appreciated.

User avatar
Whitemane
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 1545
Joined: 19 Jan 2012, 21:21
Gender: Male
Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Contact:

Re: Generalizations

Postby Whitemane » 07 Jun 2015, 01:07

Atheist, monotheist, duotheist, Unitarian, trinitarian, pantheist, polytheist, animist, you choose. OBOD uses known Celtic mythology in its training material, but there is no need to know or invoke any of the gods you learn about.
May the long time sun shine upon you,
All love surround you,
And the pure light within you,
Guide your way on.

User avatar
Reuils
OBOD Bard
Posts: 176
Joined: 20 Nov 2012, 15:24
Gender: Female
Contact:

Re: Generalizations

Postby Reuils » 08 Jun 2015, 10:24

I belong to a french seed group that honours the Celtic Deities.whilst I personally am not a theist ,I have no problem with enjoying participating in rituals with this group and merely substituting "Spirit" when they invoke a named Deity .

User avatar
DJ Droood
OBOD Druid
Posts: 5558
Joined: 02 Feb 2003, 18:52
Gender: Male
Location: North Eastern North America
Contact:

Re: Generalizations

Postby DJ Droood » 08 Jun 2015, 11:46

I belong to a french seed group that honours the Celtic Deities.whilst I personally am not a theist ,I have no problem with enjoying participating in rituals with this group and merely substituting "Spirit" when they invoke a named Deity .
I agree....I can make substitutions in my mind. What I find a bigger distraction is the paper scripts. And no, I can't think of a better idea, and I know it isn't practical for a group of people to memorize all the bits, especially at big events, etc,, and just winging it would probably end up being a shambolic mess, but staring at the sheets of paper, looking for the right page, (sometimes reading it with a candle or flashlight), waiting for my "cue" so I can say my line, etc, just doesn't work for me....those rituals can be loads of fun, but I rarely sink into them spiritually....they always feel like a first read-through of a play to me.
Image
2010 LI
2011 LI
2013 BS
Image
12/10-Ancestors
"If organized religion is the opium of the masses, then disorganized religion is the marijuana of the lunatic fringe."
Kerry Thornley


Return to “Rites of Passage”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest