Hereditary Druid

This Forum is dedicated to the Druidic search for the underlying meaning of life, the unifying nature of our common humanity, and our interconnectedness in the search for truth.
Forum rules
If you find a topic of interest and want to continue the discussion then start a new topic under The Hearthfire with a similar name and add a link back to the topic you want to continue.
To copy a link just copy the url on the top left of your browser and then put in your post, highlight it and press the url button.
druidinthemist
Posts: 83
Joined: 13 May 2014, 20:32
Gender: Male

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby druidinthemist » 10 Jan 2015, 16:20

i know very little about genetics. can we change our genetic structure over time. for example, your grandfather and his father loved fishing and taught your father a love of fishing. if you did not know your father and grandfather or great-grandfather, for whatever reason, would you possibly have acquired their love of fishing. perhaps this doesn't make sense, but it is an interesting thought.
jim

User avatar
Dathi
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 905
Joined: 18 Oct 2008, 09:16
Gender: Male
Location: Dún na nGall
Contact:

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby Dathi » 10 Jan 2015, 16:37

Greetings,

I tracked this down: The Blood of the Irish. http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x1767c ... shortfilms

It's pretty interesting in a general sense - as well as this discussion.

Dathi
:owlhorn:
Seminar. September 2010: African Druids? Sangomas, Inyangas http://www.druidry.org/board/dhp/viewto ... =2&t=36777

2011 LI
Seminar. October 2012: Druids & Bushcraft viewtopic.php?f=326&t=41256

User avatar
Heddwen
OBOD Druid
Posts: 3878
Joined: 26 Sep 2007, 16:06
Gender: Female
Location: West Wales
Contact:

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby Heddwen » 10 Jan 2015, 17:38

Do you think that some skills like 'the sight' are genetically inherited or acquired and can be taught? Does everybody have these abilities? Having gone through 3 years of the OBOD course has definitely helped hone my skills. Just wondering if its the same for everyone.

druidinthemist
Posts: 83
Joined: 13 May 2014, 20:32
Gender: Male

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby druidinthemist » 10 Jan 2015, 23:02

heddwen,

what are you referring to when you say 'the sight'?

jim

User avatar
Heddwen
OBOD Druid
Posts: 3878
Joined: 26 Sep 2007, 16:06
Gender: Female
Location: West Wales
Contact:

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby Heddwen » 11 Jan 2015, 10:01

well, some people claim to have abilities to see into the 'otherworld', the fae, or the future.

druidinthemist
Posts: 83
Joined: 13 May 2014, 20:32
Gender: Male

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby druidinthemist » 11 Jan 2015, 10:50

heddwen,

i was told by a wise older druid one time that a Celtic Shaman would see a child with 'the gift' and take them in to assist them in training and through the difficult transition periods. if this is true, i would say you have to be born with some gifts. can a druid be trained to such spiritual abilities, can a shaman? i know of a man in a local area who is training to be a shaman. he has never mentioned any gifts to me as long as we were friends, so will he be a shaman with special gifts? or will he be a trained shaman with only the abilities the training will afford him? it is an interesting question. i have not taken OBOD training, but i am sure there is much to be gained by such an experiencing. will it grant you spiritual 'abilities' is another question. and it is an interesting one that i have pondered in the past.

jim

User avatar
elementalheart
OBOD Druid
Posts: 479
Joined: 07 Nov 2011, 17:31
Gender: Female
Location: Fife, Scotland
Contact:

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby elementalheart » 11 Jan 2015, 16:17

My gratitude for the fascinating topic which has engaged my interest for quite some time now. The sense I made of it is perhaps long and not necessarily of use to the debate or relevance to others, but I offer it anyway.

First, what is heredity really about in druidry? If 'owning' it is a means of feeling superior to a 'learned' druid because of some perceived direct transmission, then it lacks the essence of what I would expect of a true spiritual practise/path of a druid because it uses an exclusive approach rather than an inclusive one that takes in not only all humanity but the whole of creation. So the basis of those generations of inherited teachings appears somewhat flawed, perhaps understandable in a dog eat dog world, but overcoming that ego need to have some greater claim than others will be a task along the way to wisdom.

Equally if being a druid of a particular level of training/knowledge is used as a means of feeling superior to a 'hedge druid' or untrained 'hereditary druid' who might have no such training/knowledge other than their own experience, or the example (positive or negative) of a relation, then it too lacks skill in judging someone who has taken a different route into the druid grove.

Is there necessarily any difference, in genetic material and indeed in worth/value, between a druid who inherited a gene AND a parental (or grandparental) training in what to do with that gift, and one who may have the same gene/gift and whose parental line at some point in history abandoned the training/practice in order to survive persecution or just get on, and who in the current generation finds themselves inexplicably drawn to druidic practices but has to learn them through other means? If a gift or gene of a druidic lineage is inherited, it may not be practised in each generation but remain in the DNA until sparked to life again by some event or experience that puts a name to that yearning.

I think sometimes the need of people to make themselves better, more worthy, more traditional, more authentic a druid than others, overwhelms the actual task of becoming the best druid one can be. A task we all face across a lifetime, regardless of the help or hindrance of our individual ancestors' generational decisions and what hardships they faced that made those decisions appear to be the best for their inheritors.

At some stage my Scottish and English ancestors abandoned druidry and Anglo Saxon rites respectively for some form of Christianity, possibly under duress, possibly for ambitions to better their prospects, who knows, perhaps just to fit in and avoid bullying. My grandfathers and grandmothers are not to be judged by anyone for not holding those faiths no matter what, and I am no less authentic in my druid path for being brought up in the faith of later generations rather than earlier ones. Genetic material does not depend on how it is used in terms of whether it passes on to the next generation.

Their teachings, however, were to value spirituality, to practise a living faith, to help others, to be creative and to honour the land. Whatever the label, I can see the values I have within druidry. My late father was a minister, a hugely devout priest who taught us to worship creator, to bless the land at planting (Rogationtide) and harvest times, to walk for miles and learn the plants of our area, to sing and meld our voices in praise and joy, to be creative with words and enjoy humour and diversity of humanity. My late mother trained as a nurse to help others through life and death, gave it up to raise three children and serve my father's parish however she could, to work and create food and clothing with little or no money and to be creative in making and mending things. If they called themselves druid I can't imagine they'd have given me more spiritually or practically than they did within a Christiann tradition. The expression of their genes was the same as they passed to me, I just call it another name when/if I define my beliefs.

If ones grandparents and parents teach the right attitudes and use different labels, I would see that as luckier for the child than parents with the right label who may or may not have instilled those qualities. Having a Christian parent didn't make me a Christian, nor a druid, it was how I chose to take my inheritance, genetic, experiential, witnessed example, and what label I found that best suited the way I live. There are plenty with supposedly Christian and presumably Druidic/Pagan parents likewise, who sadly don't get the best of their faith passed on, but the misuse of the teachings to punish and belittle and hold their child in fear of judgement and a bad end. It isn't the name but the practice of living that counts, surely.

I've been pondering this thread for quite a while so thank you for the spark of inspiration to learn what I needed from the questions raised, to apply it in my own life.
Image Image Image

druidinthemist
Posts: 83
Joined: 13 May 2014, 20:32
Gender: Male

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby druidinthemist » 11 Jan 2015, 16:47

elementalheart,

i enjoyed your post. you were very fortunate to have the parents you had. i did not. i learned what good i possess from my grandmother and in figuring out my own life experience. i think i did a remarkable job with what i was given. what disappointed me again was the idea that searching out hereditary druids was an act of arrogance--the feeling of superiority over another. this is not true. as i have stated we have much in common, but in another way we diverge. either of our 'types' of druidry is a spiritual existence. i do however get 'pissed' when so called spiritual people consider any 'negative' emotion, such as anger which can be righteous indignation, as a sign of not being on the right path. i do not candy coat life. life has not given me that privilege. i allow myself the emotions i feel. for the most part i am very content. this is why i avoid people for the most part because they distress me. people will take a few words out of a paragraph and totally twist the message to be found in the whole. we all have a measure of arrogance--i don't see how we would function without it. it is when it is the dominant factor in ones life that it is damaging and harmful to oneself and others. i do not walk a foot above the ground like so many 'spiritual' people. my feet are planted firmly on the earth, in the earth, because i am from the earth. and it is this earthiness that i have found this website sometimes lacks. i said 'sometimes'. there are no rules for being a druid. we are not in a 'measuring our walking sticks' competition--or shouldn't be. again i am grateful that people like yourself get a good start with their parents parenting--that they are 'taught' the way to follow the right path. envy is a terrible quality, but in my youth i must admit to being somewhat envious of people like yourself. now as an older man i am grateful for my extremely tough upbringing as it showed 'me' the right path--i did the complete opposite of what i was shown and taught. and it has made all the difference.

jim

User avatar
DJ Droood
OBOD Druid
Posts: 5558
Joined: 02 Feb 2003, 18:52
Gender: Male
Location: North Eastern North America
Contact:

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby DJ Droood » 11 Jan 2015, 16:52

At some stage my Scottish and English ancestors abandoned druidry and Anglo Saxon rites respectively for some form of Christianity, possibly under duress, possibly for ambitions to better their prospects, who knows, perhaps just to fit in and avoid bullying.
I've always figured it was because "the old ways" just ran out of steam....perhaps the priesthood/officials became fat and corrupt...a little too "in the pocket" of the ruling class, out of touch with the peasants...stale ideas....perhaps the sleek ways of the Romans and then the exciting new spiritual ideas of Christianity won people over without the threat of fire and sword.
Image
2010 LI
2011 LI
2013 BS
Image
12/10-Ancestors
"If organized religion is the opium of the masses, then disorganized religion is the marijuana of the lunatic fringe."
Kerry Thornley

User avatar
DaRC
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 4851
Joined: 06 Feb 2003, 17:13
Gender: Male
Location: Sussex
Contact:

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby DaRC » 13 Jan 2015, 13:34

then the exciting new spiritual ideas of Christianity won people over without the threat of fire and sword.
Certainly in England the Roman Church was quite cunning - they favoured the use of noble marriages. As mothers tended to have the greatest spiritual influence over their children it meant that even if the father remained pagan his children would be raised and educated (a key differentiator between Christianity and the pagan religion as far as we know) within the Christian church.

This long term view reaped rewards. It can also be noted that Christian leaders, in the early medieval period, supported each other. The Christian British (Welsh) princes would ally with Christian Anglo-Saxon kings against pagan aggressors.
Additionally in the early medieval Christian church the Bishops seem to walk the talk and remain more humble, pious and poor.

To get back on topic - I think the term Imbas Druid would fit you Jim.
Imbas being the Irish word for inspiration and imbas forosnai being the poetic inspiration or 'fire in the head' :shake:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imbas_forosnai
as Hereditary Druid has accumulated some baggage over the years because others have used the term as
a means of feeling superior to a 'learned' druid because of some perceived direct transmission,

it doesn't seem right, if we have to use labels to define a Druid.
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
http://gewessiman.blogspot.co.uk Image

druidinthemist
Posts: 83
Joined: 13 May 2014, 20:32
Gender: Male

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby druidinthemist » 13 Jan 2015, 13:56

Druids, like myself, and others wherever they are, are many things rolled up as One. Do not try to comprehend a Druid. Druids, like me, are dynamic, like flowing rivers. We are always the same river, but at the same time always different, changing, evolving. And from one’s vantage point he/she might be seeing a very different river than one standing upstream. A Druid is beyond human comprehension. You can describe a Druid in his/her physical human form; but it would be foolish to say your mind has captured what the sum of a Druid is—a Magician, a Seer, a Soothsayer, a Philosopher, a Poet, a Judge, a Prophet and the list goes on. That would be like me telling you exactly what Jesus was/is. I can describe Jesus, the man, speak of his teachings, but that is as far as I am willing to claim to grasp. I am spirit in nature you just can’t see me, or hear me. Your ‘self’ sees and hears the physical form of a man, and stops there. It is a dismissive stance people take to protect their ‘selves’. They seek to destroy anything different, to protect their individual status quo. It is the human instinct to protect the ‘self’ from threats of harm—instinct gone wild, so to speak. People alone are movable, in a pair still changeable, in a triad it is chaos, in greater groups it is Bedlam; in groups of three or greater, their ‘collective self’ is a force to be reckoned with, far beyond an individual ‘self’.

when i use the term 'hereditary druid', I am not talking about something passed down like an old baseball mitt. I am speaking of a Druid, with a lineage that may go back many millenia--one born with gifts beyond comprehension. i have spoken freely of my challenging 'evil'. i have a bookload of experiences that would warp the mind of any druid.

druidinthemist
Posts: 83
Joined: 13 May 2014, 20:32
Gender: Male

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby druidinthemist » 13 Jan 2015, 14:44

One from the Healer:

The Magic Apple

One day I was sitting in the lunchroom with a young native girl. She looked ill and I asked her what the matter was. She said she felt very anxious, that her stomach hurt and she had pains in her chest. I got up and went retrieving an apple from my bag. Without her knowing, I walked back to the lunchroom rubbing the skin of the apple vigorously in both hands. I approached her with hand stretched out and told her to eat this. she told me she liked apples and proceeded to devour it. I asked her how she felt. She said the anxiety was gone. Her chest and stomach no longer hurt. She said she felt really good. Then and only then I told her that i had given her a magic apple. She talked and laughed about this for sometime.

And you can add Healer, Priest, and others to the list of gifts a hereditary druid may possess. i will post more 'experiences' in time if people wish to hear. I have learned a lot at this website from various contributors. I see and interact with nature differently. I now know more nature spirituality and spirits.

jim

druidinthemist
Posts: 83
Joined: 13 May 2014, 20:32
Gender: Male

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby druidinthemist » 13 Jan 2015, 14:56

It takes a Shaman or Druid to locate a Shaman or Druid. We have vision. We know how to listen. We know what to look for and what to listen for. We do not have ‘selves’. And we both believe in spirits and the magical in life and nature. You cannot see either; even if we were pointed out to you. In a sense we have the power of invisibility in the physical world—you cannot see us, you cannot hear us, we are not there to be found.

I was standing on a street having a smoke when a short, stout native man approached me. He asked if I had some tobacco. I handed him my pouch and put my hand out to greet him. He stepped back and said he knew what i was. He handed me some cedar bow from his pocket and said that this would protect me. A shaman had found me. Later I went looking for him and found him passed out on a picnic table--i don't know what he was drinking. There were two native men, guardians, watching over him. I said our friend seems to be in a terrible state. they said he would be alright, that he was a very powerful shaman.

I had a dream in which I was a Druid judge. I was given the task of building a settlement. Citizens kept bringing lawbreakers to me for punishment (no one wants to punish, a judge’s heart should be filled with sorrow—not anger—as they pass sentence) and i kept giving them jobs in the construction of our village. The citizens were angered by my unlimited mercy and compassion.

jim

druidinthemist
Posts: 83
Joined: 13 May 2014, 20:32
Gender: Male

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby druidinthemist » 13 Jan 2015, 15:37

there it is. i am 'outed'. i came in search of a 'hereditary' druid; one like I, and have been met only with misunderstanding and judgement. if there are any out there who can relate to what i have offered, please email me. i wish to share experiences. thank you.

jim

User avatar
Heddwen
OBOD Druid
Posts: 3878
Joined: 26 Sep 2007, 16:06
Gender: Female
Location: West Wales
Contact:

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby Heddwen » 13 Jan 2015, 17:25

there it is. i am 'outed'. i came in search of a 'hereditary' druid; one like I, and have been met only with misunderstanding and judgement. if there are any out there who can relate to what i have offered, please email me. i wish to share experiences. thank you.

jim
I'm sorry that you feel this way. It is my intention to 'understand' . Personally, I don't feel that being a hereditry druid (no matter how many generations ) is anything 'better' than being a non herditary druid. You imply that hereditary druids are 'special' and that the rest of us are not. In your words, "you can not see either. Even if it were pointed out to you." How do you know that we can not see?

Some of us have chosen to take this OBOD training to hone and improve our skills as druids. We do all the things that you have listed as well as the 'extras' that we get by doing the course. We also have community, not just here

User avatar
Heddwen
OBOD Druid
Posts: 3878
Joined: 26 Sep 2007, 16:06
Gender: Female
Location: West Wales
Contact:

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby Heddwen » 13 Jan 2015, 17:26

not just here where all are welcomed - OBOD or not.

User avatar
Heddwen
OBOD Druid
Posts: 3878
Joined: 26 Sep 2007, 16:06
Gender: Female
Location: West Wales
Contact:

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby Heddwen » 13 Jan 2015, 17:28

sorry, my computer had a glitch there.

druidinthemist
Posts: 83
Joined: 13 May 2014, 20:32
Gender: Male

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby druidinthemist » 13 Jan 2015, 17:43

heddwen,

my apologies. another way of looking at this is that i have tapped you on the forehead and now you are in a defensive pose. ask yourself why this line bothers you so much. look within. and when you have found your answer, go back and read my posts and all the posts here on 'hereditary' druids with fresh eyes. look for defensive posterings in many. look for group-think defenses amoung some. look for the Truth--see and hear what is being said. and don't for one moment think we are all the same, or that you are the measure of all that write here. like i have said i have yet to find another like me, though i keep searching and wish i could. i am not the measure of anyone, i am like you unique, just different than most. there are no two people alike on the planet, but some share beliefs and minds--especially I have found, in druidry.

jim

druidinthemist
Posts: 83
Joined: 13 May 2014, 20:32
Gender: Male

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby druidinthemist » 13 Jan 2015, 18:09

hello all,

this will be my last post. i have decided to give up the search, far too frustrating, and distressing to my contentment. i will continue to read anyone's words that are put here. i have put a few lines in the waters and have stirred up a mirky bottom. i will see what grabs my lines. i have learned much about druidry here, the human nature stuff i have known for years, that is why i have kept to myself for the most part. people are, and will be, people. i am used to talking to myself at this stage in my life and development. i would hope that the obod training teaches you to look inside and see what is there. i hope it all isn't about nature and earth cycles and rituals. how can you percieve nature for what it is when you have a 'Self' standing in your way. Truth can bring out defensiveness, which can become anger. if any of my writings have or now make you angry, please cease and go on to someone else's thoughts and ideas. i did not mean to disturb your serenity. i wish you all the very best, and again thank you,

peace

druidinthemist

User avatar
Heddwen
OBOD Druid
Posts: 3878
Joined: 26 Sep 2007, 16:06
Gender: Female
Location: West Wales
Contact:

Re: Hereditary Druid

Postby Heddwen » 13 Jan 2015, 18:25

No need to apologise :)

I think that what I'm trying to get at is that we may have more similarities than differences.


Return to “The Common Quest”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests