Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Forum rules
If you find a topic of interest and want to continue the discussion then start a new topic under The Hearthfire with a similar name and add a link back to the topic you want to continue.
To copy a link just copy the url on the top left of your browser and then put in your post, highlight it and press the url button.
User avatar
Fitheach
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2762
Joined: 08 Feb 2003, 21:46
Gender: Female
Location: "Tir na Darach", California, U.S.A.
Contact:

Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby Fitheach » 04 Apr 2007, 04:28

Image

:eadha:

Eadha

The whispering Poplars
Utter secrets to the wind.
The enigmas of the stars,
They’ll share with kith and kin.

Conferring ‘cross the forest floor
Their message spreads afar
From the mountains to the shore
They hold a woodland seminar.

Their nature is both black and white
As they dwell beneath the Moon
Seek them in the day or night
And ask of them a boon.
Tha gliocas an ceann an fhitich
Image Image Image

User avatar
Dryadia2
OBOD Druid
Posts: 10055
Joined: 02 Jun 2005, 18:10
Gender: Female
Location: Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, USA
Contact:

Postby Dryadia2 » 12 Apr 2007, 23:37

I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than any city on earth - Steve McQueen

User avatar
Jingle
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 2513
Joined: 14 Dec 2005, 19:25
Gender: Female
Location: Allentown, Pennsylvania
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby Jingle » 14 Apr 2008, 03:23

Tulip Poplar (Yellow Poplar or American Tulip Tree) is native to the Eastern United States where I live.

Long have I searched for you
In leafless winter unrecognizable.
But shapely foliage left at your base
Your tulips clinging to empty twigs

But on this day of perfect balance
The others hunting colored eggs
I sit beneath you while the yellow sun
Warms my eyelids. I am at peace.

The fresh forest breeze
Begins to smell of new growth
Beside me brambles
Are newly emerging

And on this day of perfect balance
I know why you have called
Through the winter into my heart
To end my dreary days

I will come again as Beltaine wakens.
You will be clothed in green
And I will rejoice
In Spring.
Light,

Jingle

ImageImage :ioho: :recycle:
Image
2008 IL
Image
2009 BS
---------------
Young and alone on a long road, Once I lost my way: Rich I felt when I found another; Man rejoices in man. ~ Hávamál
----------------
Avatar edited from http://www.hawkmountain.org - watching and protecting our magnificent birds of prey...

User avatar
Fitheach
OBOD Druid
Posts: 2762
Joined: 08 Feb 2003, 21:46
Gender: Female
Location: "Tir na Darach", California, U.S.A.
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby Fitheach » 14 Apr 2008, 22:47

What a lovely poem!!
Tha gliocas an ceann an fhitich
Image Image Image

User avatar
MountainGnome
Posts: 145
Joined: 05 Oct 2009, 03:55
Gender: Male
Location: États Unis
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby MountainGnome » 12 Oct 2009, 09:21

Yellow Poplar native to the East:

Image

Image

http://www.dof.virginia.gov/trees/poplar-yellow.htm
Also known as Tuliptree or Tulip-Poplar.

Mature Size: Typically 90 to 110 feet in height and 2 to 3 feet in diameter, but can reach nearly 200 feet in height and 10 feet in diameter.

Form: Very long, straight trunk with a compact, pyramidal crown.

Habitat: Various moist, well-drained sites statewide, but attains best growth on deep moist soils along streams and in lower mountain coves.

MiriamSPia
Posts: 128
Joined: 26 Sep 2010, 16:31
Gender: Female
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby MiriamSPia » 11 Nov 2010, 20:13

Tulip poplars grow in many locations including the sacred turf of Lothlorien Nature Sanctuary near Needmore Indiana. Lothlorien prides itself on also being a place where druids and wiccans celebrate the Wheel of the Year festivals. There are shrines, and fields. Clothing is optional - which means you do not need to be naked, but if you want to sunbath in the buff or go skinny dipping in the on site river then you are not going to slapped with a criminal indecent exposure penalty. It is not a nudist camp, so nudity is occasional not "the norm".

Many of the tulip poplars there are quite young: I'd say under 30 years. They can certainly grow to be over 50 feet. Their leaves come out in about April and they hang on until deep into November. At least, that's what I think. I know this type of tree, but not incredibly deeply. Populus, is their Latin genus name. These may also be called aspen. They have healing properties when properly handled.

These are of the Aicme Ailm/ailim, Eadha in Celtic. Their symbol is one vertical line with 5 horizontal lines that are centered in both directions relative to the vertical line.

User avatar
Serpentia
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 460
Joined: 06 Sep 2008, 16:27
Gender: Female
Location: Nidderau, Germany
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby Serpentia » 22 Dec 2010, 12:59

These may also be called aspen
Em, yes.. quite confusing here now... I will have to look into this and find some examples so I can see the difference.

Serpentia
Facilitator of www.druidryonline.de, the NEW German Druid Community on the web

User avatar
Huathe
Posts: 628
Joined: 13 Sep 2010, 03:42
Gender: Male
Location: Asheville NC USA
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby Huathe » 22 Dec 2010, 18:13

Serpentia,

Tulip Poplar is the tallest native hardwood in the United States. A couple of years back I went on an ENTS expedition in the Great Smokies to measure a Tulip Poplar that turned out to be a record holder at 181.3 feet tall. This year it was beaten by another tall tulip, also in the Smokies which was an awesome 187.5 feet tall!

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldt ... imbed1.htm
http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=74&t=1122

The largest Tuliptree by wood volume is the Sag Branch Poplar in the Cataloochee Valley of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It is one awesome tree!

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldt ... _tulip.htm

Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest also has some outstanding tuliptrees. I have measured some to over 160 feet tall and trunk circumferences over 20 feet!

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldt ... _2008a.htm
http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=106&t=379

Tulip Poplar is truly an amazing species. Though we know it by the name " poplar " or " yellow poplar " here in the east, it is actually not a true poplar at all, but a member of the magnolia family of trees.

:huathe: H.E.
Joy and Tulip Poplar.jpg
Joy and Tulip Poplar.jpg (104.88 KiB) Viewed 4598 times
James E Parton
Bardic Course Graduate - Ovate Student
New Order of Druids

" We all cry tears, we all bleed red "_Ronnie Dunn

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/
http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145
http://www.burningman.com/

User avatar
Serpentia
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 460
Joined: 06 Sep 2008, 16:27
Gender: Female
Location: Nidderau, Germany
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby Serpentia » 22 Dec 2010, 22:04

it is actually not a true poplar at all, but a member of the magnolia family of trees.
Thanks, that helps. The American tree we are talking about here has nothing whatsoever to do with our European Aspen, called Zitterpappel (from zittern = tremble, pappel = poplar). The pictures are quite clear on that. And the American Aspen is also different, but at least of the same family.

As far as the Ogham is concerned, I will use the Zitterpappel for Eadha and replace the other one (Eabhadh) with the Linden tree now. Fits beautifully.

Serpentia
who knew you would come up with some more HUGE trees :shake:
Facilitator of www.druidryonline.de, the NEW German Druid Community on the web

User avatar
Huathe
Posts: 628
Joined: 13 Sep 2010, 03:42
Gender: Male
Location: Asheville NC USA
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby Huathe » 23 Dec 2010, 06:17

Serpentia,

Quaking Aspen is the tree you speak of that is related to your European species. It is so common in the Rockies. Another is Bigtooth Aspen. But here in the Eastern US when someone talks of poplars they are usually speaking of the majestic Yellow Poplar or Tuliptree.

The scientific name for Tuliptree is Liriodendron Tulipifera.

Hey, what can I say? Big trees are an ENTS specialty! I love em'!!

:yay:
James E Parton
Bardic Course Graduate - Ovate Student
New Order of Druids

" We all cry tears, we all bleed red "_Ronnie Dunn

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/
http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145
http://www.burningman.com/

User avatar
Serpentia
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 460
Joined: 06 Sep 2008, 16:27
Gender: Female
Location: Nidderau, Germany
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby Serpentia » 23 Dec 2010, 08:03

You know what I love? Old trees.. not far from where I live is Germany's probably oldest tree, a Linden Tree that may be 1200 years old. We don't have many old trees hereabouts; part of that is due to the massive use of wood during the middle ages, part of it is the Christian missionaries who are actually and really famous (!) for chopping down the old trees venerated by the "barbarous hordes" - as in, my ancestors, may their reincarnations be many!!

Yews, oaks, Linden, obviously, they all grow to be old. But most fascinating to me are old Birch trees. Birches, as you sure know, don't get very old. If they see 60 or 70 years,they're ancient. And then they turn black, with the trunks deeply gorged, fissures deeper than any oak. And yet the leaves are still dancing in the wind and the whole tree gives off an air of "I may be old in years, but I remain young in spirit."

As I get older, too, I can appreciate that very much. Being a spring hare (born on Easter Sunday), my birth tree is the Birch and so we grow old and stay young together, and that is beautiful.

Serpentia
Facilitator of www.druidryonline.de, the NEW German Druid Community on the web

User avatar
DaRC
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 4875
Joined: 06 Feb 2003, 17:13
Gender: Male
Location: Sussex
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby DaRC » 23 Dec 2010, 12:39

Fortunately here the Christian's did not seem as keen on removing the trees from sacred sites - particularly Yews - so there are quite a few churchyards that have Yews over 1000 years old. Much of the ancient Anderida forest here in the Low Weald in Sussex has been denuded for ship building and the iron trade.

Personally, this year I've come across the Grey Poplar which is a hybrid of the Poplar Tremula (Common Aspen) and the Poplar alba (White Poplar). There is a great stand nearby where the light grey undersides of the leaves catch the light of the sun as they flutter in the breeze. What I find interesting with the Poplars and Aspen is that they often propagate via suckers which means that the grove/stand/colony is of interlinked clones coming from a single root system.
The Pando colony in Utah could be as old as 80,000 years!
http://ten-thousand-trees.blogspot.com/ ... olony.html
Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
most sweet the sight of the sun;
good is health if one can but keep it,
and to live a life without shame. (Havamal 68)
http://gewessiman.blogspot.co.uk Image

User avatar
Huathe
Posts: 628
Joined: 13 Sep 2010, 03:42
Gender: Male
Location: Asheville NC USA
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby Huathe » 23 Dec 2010, 15:12

Serpentia,

I was born on Oct 2nd and I wonder what my birth tree is? How did you find that out?
James E Parton
Bardic Course Graduate - Ovate Student
New Order of Druids

" We all cry tears, we all bleed red "_Ronnie Dunn

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/
http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145
http://www.burningman.com/

User avatar
Serpentia
OBOD Ovate
Posts: 460
Joined: 06 Sep 2008, 16:27
Gender: Female
Location: Nidderau, Germany
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby Serpentia » 23 Dec 2010, 15:36

Well, there'sRobert Graves infamous Celtic Tree Calendar - actually, one of them as there are many different ones, none being authentic. The reason I call the Birch my "birth tree" is because I was born in Spring.. and Birch is the tree of spring, the first to turn green. Beginnings and all that. I have three tree sisters, so to speak, and the Birch is my youth, the Linden my adulthood, and the Yew my old age.
Robert Graves wrote in The White Goddess:

Beth (Birch) December 24 to January 20
Luis (Rowan) January 21 to February 17
Nion (Ash) February 18 to March 17
Fearn (Alder) March 18 to April 14
Saille (Willow) April 15 to May 12
Uath (Hawthorn) May 13 to June 9
Duir (Oak) June 10 to July 7
Tinne (Holly) July 8 to August 4
Coll (Hazel) August 5 to September 1
Muin (Vine) September 2 to September 29
Gort (Ivy) September 30 to October 27
Ngetal (Reed) October 28 to November 24
Ruis (Elder) November 25 to December 22
December 23 is not ruled by any tree for it is the traditional day of the proverbial "Year and a Day" in the earliest courts of law.
Here's more details and background for you: http://www.maryjones.us/jce/celtictreecalendar.html
Facilitator of www.druidryonline.de, the NEW German Druid Community on the web

User avatar
Huathe
Posts: 628
Joined: 13 Sep 2010, 03:42
Gender: Male
Location: Asheville NC USA
Contact:

Re: Ogham Studies - Eadha (Poplar)

Postby Huathe » 23 Dec 2010, 23:36

Mine is Ivy, Thank you, Serpentia!
James E Parton
Bardic Course Graduate - Ovate Student
New Order of Druids

" We all cry tears, we all bleed red "_Ronnie Dunn

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/
http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145
http://www.burningman.com/


Return to “The Ogham Library”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest