camse ac camelot

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chimera
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camse ac camelot

Post by chimera » 18 Oct 2006, 04:04

That post got scrambled in the mail. get it right!

Cambric cloth was worn under women's hats, possibly linked to "camse" <Fr> kemel.khamlat "camelot' fine cloth.
Fr. beige /bezh/  "wool" is seen in cambyses/kambujiya/ kamBUZI "robe of Babylon's king", Gr. byses "prince's robe" . Camelot of Asia Minor Angoras may be in Greek kamelaukion "cloth crown. ceiling cloth of church".
Are there any suggestions that camse chimere of camelot were known in Celtic times?
chimera

Megli
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Post by Megli » 18 Oct 2006, 10:54

No. camse in welsh is from latin camisia, which also gives french chemise, 'shirt'. I have a feeling the khamlat thing is arabic - omething the crusaders brought back probably.
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chimera
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Post by chimera » 18 Oct 2006, 23:48

My post got scrambled, even when I reposted by copy ... strange.
I wrote that camse<chemise. Then chamarre<zimarra of Galicia , where zamarrones wore a goathead on their head. That suggests a pre-Crusades, pre-Christian origin for acciamara of Sardinia, L. zimara , which gets close to Asia Minor.
Arabic "khamlat" I believe is abnormal with double consonants, suggesting a loan-word. "Kamelaukion" of Byzantium and "kambuzi" of Persia-Babylon indicate an Aryan history for "kam-".
Skt. "camara" regalia tassel and Bavarian (Celtic) "gamsbart" national tassel of gamse chamois deer-hair,  relate to sacred deer-goats. This is seen in Skt. Brahmin "chamara" regalia tassel in Thailand today, and made of chamari deer-hair. "Cambyses" and "byses" robes of Persian royals are from 5thcent BC when Mithraic Persians (Mithradates kings) were in Asia Minor.
Mithradates I of Pontus Asia Minor had Gaul support before Gauls ruled Galatia.  In the Daeva Inscription of Xerxes, Skt. bramanya means "religious" and Pers. bramaniya means "reverently". This suggests that "bram" was a sacred word, rather than a god. German "bram" may then go with "gamsbart" as symbols, with "kam-" robes /tassels of the goat.
OFr. tasseau means "tassel as clasp for robe".
chimera

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